Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This extremely rare collection of photographs comes from the descendants of Titanic survivors John and Nelle Pillsbury Snyder. Philip Weiss Auctions was handling the collection's sale planned for Oct. 21, 2011. It's estimated to go for $50,000 to $75,000. This photo shows the Snyders, taken April 18, 1912, the day they disembarked from the ship Carpathia after surviving the sinking of the Titanic.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This letter written by John Snyder on R.M.S. Titanic stationary was addressed to a proprietor of a London tobacco shop. "While I sit here at the writing desk peacefully and complacently smoking 'one of your best cigars' I just want to thank you," the letter says. It's dated April 10, 1912. The Titanic struck an iceberg on the evening of April 14, 1912.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    In this original photo, a few survivors from the Titanic can be seen in lifeboats out in the open ocean, rowing towards the rescue ship, the Carpathia. After the Titanic sent out its distress call, the Carpathia, which was also sailing for New York, steamed ahead to pick up survivors. Of the 2,228 people on board the Titanic, only 705 passengers survived.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This original photo shows another lifeboat with its sail up full of Titanic survivors as it makes its way to the rescue ship, the Carpathia. The Titanic sank at 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. The Carpathia arrived at 4:00 a.m. that same morning.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This original 3-by-5 1/2-inch photo was taken on the desk of the Carpathia, and shows an ice field looping in the distance over the ocean. The water's temperature was around 28 degrees Fahrenheit on the night of April 14, 1912.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This original 3-by-5 1/2-inch photo was taken on the desk of the Carpathia, and shows icebergs in the distance off to the far right-hand side of the frame.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This original 3-by-5 1/2-inch photo was taken on the desk of the Carpathia, and shows chunks of ice dotting a flat open ocean.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This original photo shows what appeared to be the S.S. Californian heading towards the Carpathia. In a series of images, the Californian appears progressively larger. After the Carpathia had picked up survivors, the Californian arrived at 8:30 a.m. on April 15, 1912 and searched through the wreckage.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This original photo taken from the deck of the Carpathia shows a close image of S.S. Californian, a single stack, four mast ship.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    John Snyder wrote this letter, dated April 24, 1912, to his father Frank. It gave a harrowing first-hand account of being on the sinking Titanic. "We were both asleep when the boat hit."... "We were almost the very first people placed in the Lifeboat ... Finally the bow went under -- the finest boat in the world was doomed."
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Never Before Seen Titanic Images

    This typed letter, dated April 18, 1912, is from John Snyder's father, Frank, to his brother, Fred, detailing the aftermath of the historic sinking of the Titanic. "As you can imagine we have been under a pretty severe strain for the past three or four days on account of the wrecking of the Titanic on which boat John and Nelle sailed," the letter says in its opening sentence.
    Courtesy Philip Weiss Auctions
  • Titanic Exhibit

    A commemorative photograph of "The S.S. Titanic," a designation its owners at the White Star Line did not use during its short life. Launched on May 31, 1911, it was lost on its maiden voyage less than a year later. Its lifeboats, complying with regulations at the time, had space for 1,178 passengers. Only 705 of the 2,223 people on board were saved.
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  • Titanic Exhibit

    Captain E.J. Smith (second from right in front row with white beard) and the officers of the Titanic. They pushed the new ship to set a speed record for a transatlantic crossing on its maiden voyage, after which Smith intended to retire. He and most of his senior officers died when the ship hit an iceberg in the dark. The seniormost officer to survive was Second Officer Charles Lightoller.
    Courtesy National Museums Northern Ireland (NMNI) and the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
  • Titanic Exhibit

    One of Titanic's second class cabins.
    Courtesy National Museums Northern Ireland (NMNI) and the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
  • Titanic Exhibit

    A second-class cabin on the Titanic. Adult men in first class had a better chance of surviving the sinking than children in steerage.
    Courtesy National Museums Northern Ireland (NMNI) and the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
  • Titanic

    A first-class passenger list includes Mrs. D.S. Peel of Atlanta, who was reported save on board the Cunard liner Carpathia, the only ship to come to the rescue after the Titanic's distress call. This list, which included some of the most prominent names in society in 1912, fetched $48,000 at auction in 2007.
    Christie's Images Ltd 2007
  • Titanic Exhibit

    The Titanic docked in Belfast, February 1912. It underwent sea trials before setting sail from England to New York in April.
    Courtesy National Museums Northern Ireland (NMNI) and the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
  • Titanic Exhibit

    A Marconi wireless telegram from the RMS Olympic, Titanic's sister ship, reports the Carpathia's rush to the site where the Titanic went down. "Found boats and wreckage only," it says in part. "About 675 souls saved crew and passengers."
    Courtesy National Museums Northern Ireland (NMNI) and the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
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