Oil, Money and Politics on Display at Stevens Trial

In court proceedings this week, the government also referenced a $29,000 fish statue that was given to the senator, defense lawyers have said this was not relevant and was meant to be in in a library bearing Stevens' name. The prosecution noted the statue was on the porch of the senator's home.

Judge Emmett Sullivan has also ruled that the government can present evidence relating to real estate deals Stevens allegedly made in Florida that he also did not report on his Senate financial reports.

In court papers filed by the government, the prosecution noted, "At trial, the United States will seek to introduce evidence that, between 2001 and 2003, Stevens was intimately involved in a Florida real estate transaction with another personal friend. After an initial investment of only $5,000 by Stevens, Stevens' friend sold his real estate interest only six months later, with an eventual gross profit to Stevens of more than $100,000."

The government has proposed a total of more than 1,000 exhibits that could be submitted into evidence at trial.

The government's case is expected to rely on financial statements and records of Stevens as well e-mails and intercepted conversations recorded by the FBI between Stevens and Allen.

The government likely also will attempt to show that Stevens knew he did not accurately file the financial forms and was concerned about individuals who were called to testify before the grand jury in the investigation.

Court documents filed by the prosecution revealed e-mails that Stevens sent to a witness, identified in the documents as Person A, who was called before the grand jury. In an Aug. 14 court filing, the government noted that "by mid-May 2007, Stevens learned that Person A had been subpoenaed to testify before a grand jury in D.C. On May 17, 2007, Stevens sent Person A two e-mails that discussed Person A's upcoming grand jury testimony. In the first e-mail, Stevens told Person A that 'I hope we can work something out to make sure you aren't led astray on this occasion.' In the second, Stevens was more explicit: 'don't answer questions you don't KNOW the answers to.'"

The statewide corruption investigation has also tarnished Stevens' son, Ben, a state senator. The FBI searched Ben Stevens' state offices in August 2006, though the younger Stevens has not been charged with a crime and has said he did nothing wrong.

Stemming from the Veco investigation, there is an ongoing FBI-Justice Department investigation into public corruption in the state of Alaska that has resulted in eight convictions to date -- with three outstanding cases, including the senator's.

The other cases involve John Cowdery, a current member of the Alaska state senate, who was indicted on July 10 and is also awaiting trial (no trial date has been set yet); and Bruce Weyrauch, an attorney and member of the Alaska house from 2002 to January 2007, who was indicted in May 2007.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 5844172.
Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...