'This Week' Transcript: Gen Peter Chiarelli

SPECIALIST PAGAN IS ALSO ONE OF THE LUCKY ONES…JERICHO HELPED HIM TOO…

SOT JOSE PAGAN: Everything changed. I have an apartment. And it was the first time. First time, especially as a grown man that-- I've gotten a gift like this. So, it was an amazing feeling. I have a place. this is what I call-- it's my little-- it's home.

CHRISTIANE AMANPOUR, HOST: Bob, thank you so much. That's very, very powerful. So good news at the end, but so many thousands of veterans homeless. Why is it that Iraq and Afghanistan returning vets are becoming homeless faster than they did when they came back from Vietnam?

BOB WOODRUFF, CORRESPONDENT: You can say in Vietnam it was they're going back to a civilian world that existed. So many came back. And you look at the numbers, about 11 percent of Americans served in Vietnam. Now it's only about 1 percent. So when they come back, they're largely alone.

They don't have any information about how they can get so much help. So they end up really temporarily as homeless, as opposed to Vietnam, which was after five to 10 years it became permanent, because of the way they were treated when they came back. They were spat upon, and they didn't have any help at all.

AMANPOUR: But they're not finding that now, right? They're not finding that they're ostracized?

WOODRUFF: They're not ostracized. It's exactly that. Once they find out what they can do, they begin it. That's the one that they say (ph). It's not that there's not help available to them. They just don't know anything about it. And the ones that are coming out of all the wars, the numbers every day, homelessness, the V.A. says about 107,000 veterans are homeless every day from all the wars, not Iraq and Afghanistan.

AMANPOUR: Some 9,000 or so from Iraq and Afghanistan?

WOODRUFF: That's what they say. Yes.

AMANPOUR: Another issue that you are obviously intimately familiar with, because you suffered traumatic injury from an IED in Iraq, is the catastrophic injuries that many of these vets are coming back with. At the Walter Reed Hospital you spoke to an army corporal about the situation and about her possible recovery. Let's just play what you said to her and what she said to you.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

WOODRUFF: How long do you think this recovery is going to take?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Maybe a lifetime for the mentally (ph). You never know.

WOODRUFF: I know that this has been a long road. Think you're going to spend... (AUDIO GAP)

(END VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Here we go. Stand by.

AMANPOUR: Is it done now? Another issue that you're obviously intimately familiar with, because you've suffered traumatic injuries with IED in Iraq, is the catastrophic injuries that many of these vets are coming back with. At the Walter Reed Hospital, you spoke with an Army corporal about the situation and about her possible recovery. Let's just play what you said to her and what she said to you.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

WOODRUFF: How long do you think this recovery is going to take?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Maybe a lifetime for the mentally (ph). You never know.

WOODRUFF: I know that this has been a long road. Think you're going to spend a year walking better, dealing with PTSD you've got? Or do you think this is long-term for much of your life?

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