'This Week' Transcript: White House Press Secretary Jay Carney

KARL (voice-over): Then there's the criticism leveled by the executive editor of "The New York Times," who called the Obama White House "the most secretive White House I have ever been involved in covering."

(on camera): You covered White Houses as a reporter for "Time Magazine."

So would Jay Carney, reporter, correspondent, bureau chief for "Time" magazine, be satisfied with the level of openness and transparency of this White House?

CARNEY: Well, Jay Carney, reporter, would never be satisfied with, uh, the amount of information that any White House or any Congressional office...

KARL: But Jay Carney would fight with Jay Carney.

CARNEY: Well, what I would tell you is that you and all of your colleagues and my former colleagues in the press absolutely have to be beating on us and others around Washington to get as much information as you can. And I strongly disagree with that statement. I know from experience that it's wrong. And, you know, we provide an extraordinary amount of information and access to reporters. And we work every day to, uh, to provide more.

(END VIDEO TAPE)

KARL: And now the roundtable, former Pennsylvania senator and presidential candidate, Rick Santorum; Van Jones, co-host of CNN's "Crossfire"; Cokie Roberts, who has written a new book, out Tuesday, "Founding Mothers;" and Greta Van Susteren of Fox News.

So, you know, Jay talked about how they want to bypass Congress and they're clearly not going to judge the success this year based on what they pass.

But, Cokie, we see the headlines this week and that actually, Republicans are talking about moving forward on immigration reform.

Can the president finally get what he's never had, a bipartisan legislative accomplishment?

COKIE ROBERTS, ABC NEWS CORRESPONDENT: Well, they did have the budget agreement last week, which he signed, those 1,600 pages...

KARL: Well, that's kind of like...

ROBERTS: Well, that's...

(CROSSTALK)

ROBERTS: But at least that...

(CROSSTALK)

ROBERTS: -- oh, that's...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We'll take it.

ROBERTS: -- that's a big change.

But, look, the Republicans are understanding that their own self-interests means immigration reform. And the question is, can they get past these primaries or the filing deadlines for the Republican primaries, and then do an immigration bill?

And they're going to discover this weekend...

KARL: Does it happen?

Do you think it happens?

ROBERTS: I think it does happen. I think it happens in pieces and you put together a different coalition on each piece. So you have one group of congressmen voting for border security, another group voting for legalization, another group...

(CROSSTALK)

ROBERTS: -- voting for visas for high end workers. You go -- you go bit by bit and then bring it to conference with the Senate.

KARL: Senator Santorum...

RICK SANTORUM (R-PA), FORMER PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: That's...

(CROSSTALK)

SANTORUM: -- that's a very tall order. That's -- it's a -- I -- I've never seen that done in Congress. I mean you get these big bills and that's how these things pass. And it's very, very hard to get all those component parts together and get a consensus, particularly when you have a president who has been as, uh, vindictive as this president has been in attacking his Republicans for a variety of -- on a variety of issues...

KARL: But not on immigration. I mean he's actually trying...

(CROSSTALK)

KARL: -- trying to get a deal with the Republicans.

Page
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...