Brothers Trained 24-Year-Old Woman to Rob Southern Jewelry Stores, FBI Says

PHOTO: The FBI released these photos on Jan. 5, 2016, of the suspect wanted in connection with several jewelry store thefts.PlayFBI Jacksonville
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Two Atlanta brothers have been charged in connection with a string of armed jewelry store robberies across the South, and according to newly released documents they may have trained a 24-year-old woman who was caught on surveillance video and later arrested in connection with the robberies.

In an affidavit, FBI investigators say Abigail Kemp -- accused of taking $4 million in jewelry during six armed robberies across several Southern states -- was part of a four-person team behind the string of robberies.

Larry Bernard Gilmore, 43, and Michael Bernard Gilmore, 46, both of Atlanta, appeared in federal court on Friday, charged with "conspiracy to interfere with commerce by threats of violence."

Officials accused the pair, along with Lewis Jones III -- who was previously charged -- of finding, recruiting, and training Kemp.

The affidavit alleged that the training took place at a window tint shop in Atlanta, where they reviewed layouts of the targeted jewelry stores, how to manipulate a handgun, how to use zip ties, what code words to use, what merchandise to steal, and what clothes to wear.

The Gilmores and Jones are accused of selecting the dates and locations of the stores to be robbed and of serving as the lookouts for Kemp during the robberies by providing security and surveillance.

Authorities say the four split into pairs. Kemp and Jones would go to the stores, and the brothers would serve as lookouts.

"If you watch her [Kemp's] behavior inside the store, it's very deliberate about what she does," said Brad Garrett, an ABC contributor and former FBI special agent.

According to the affidavit, cell phone pings put the brothers near each of the robbery locations during the crimes. Call records allegedly show Jones talking to the brothers before and after each robbery.

"Each store that you rob, the police tend to gather a little bit more information," Garrett said. "Cell phone activity, photographs, informant information, etc., lead to your capture at some point."

Kemp and Jones were both previously charged with conspiracy to interfere with commerce by threats or violence. They pleaded not guilty.

The Gilmore brothers have not yet entered a plea, and a spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Florida said it was not clear whether they had attorneys.

All four face 20 years in prison if convicted.