Drew Peterson Found Guilty of Killing Wife, Making It Look Like Accident

Share
Copy

Peterson's attorneys called for a mistrial three times during the course of the trial after prosecutors introduced evidence to the jury that was not approved by Burmila. They withdrew their final request.

In closing arguments on Tuesday, both sides focused on the testimony of their expert witnesses, forensic pathologists who testified about the injuries found on Savio's body. The defense presented experts who testified that Savio's injuries clearly pointed to an accidental death, while the prosecution's experts said the injuries indicated a brutal murder.

Prosecutors reminded the jury that a witness called by the defense admitted that the chance of a healthy adult drowning in a bathtub was "one in a million."

"Drew Peterson had the motive and means to make his third wife, Kathleen Savio's bathtub drowning look like an accident," prosecutor Chris Koch said.

Peterson's defense attorneys, however, remained committed to the fact that there are no eyewitness accounts and there is no physical evidence tying Peterson to the scene of Savio's death.

"There [are] no witnesses or scientific evidence that place Drew at the house. They can't even prove that Ms. Savio was the victim of a homicide," defense attorney Michael Lopez said in his closing argument, according to ABC station WLS-TV. "They're trying to nail Jell-O to a tree -- it's an accident, it's an accident, pure and simple."

"The state has not proved this case beyond a reasonable doubt; this case is riddled with doubt like a piece of Swiss cheese," he said.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Year In Pictures
Damien Meyer/AFP/Getty Images
PHOTO: James Franco and Seth Rogen in The Interview.
Ed Araquel/Sony/Columbia Pictures/AP Photo
PHOTO: Patrick Crawford is pictured in this photo from his Facebook page.
Meteorologist Patrick Crawford KCEN/Facebook
PHOTO: George Stinney Jr., the youngest person ever executed in South Carolina, in 1944, is seen in this undated file photo.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History/AP Photo