No Federal Regulations for Roller Coaster Safety

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After Ayala-Goana's death on Friday, a similar coaster, the Iron Rattler at the Six Flags Fiesta Texas park in San Antonio, was shut down as a precaution, according to park managers there.

"There are some similarities. It was closed late Friday evening when we heard of the incident," spokeswoman Sydne Purvis said.

But other parks across the country continue to operate their roller coasters.

The CEO of Six Flags, James Reid-Anderson, said Monday that he expects the company to see "short to medium-term attendance impact at the park," due to safety concerns after Ayala-Gaona's death, but that other parks should fare fine after the safety scare, according to USA Today.

Six Flags did not respond to ABC News for comment.

The International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions, an industry trade association, said in a statement to ABC News Monday that "events like (Ayala-Goana's death) are extremely rare and safety is the number one priority for the amusement park industry."

The group said that the chance of being seriously injured on an amusement park ride in the U.S. is one in 24 million, while the likelihood of being killed is one in 750 million.

"We support efforts that would truly enhance safety," they said. "There is no evidence federal oversight would improve on the already excellent safety record of the industry."

ABC News' parent company, The Walt Disney Company, operates Disneyland in California and Walt Disney World in Florida.

Theme parks in California are regulated by the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, and rides are inspected annually by state inspectors.

In Florida, the state's Department of Agriculture is in charge of inspecting theme park rides and carnivals except for parks that have more than 1,000 employees and full-time inspectors on staff, such as Disney World. Then, staff inspectors are responsible for investigating and reporting all incidents to the state, according to the company.

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