Ground Zero Celebration of Osama Bin Laden's Death Is Bittersweet for 9/11 Families

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Osama bin Laden's Death Sparks Celebrations Nationwide

For most Americans, the news that bin Laden was tracked down and killed 10 years after he attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon was a mix of celebration and pride.

At Ground Zero this morning, one woman held up an iPad serving as makeshift poster, which read "Obama: 1, Osama: 0." Muslim women in head scarves and Muslim men in turbans and long beards carrying American flags, mixed with retired firefighters, service members in uniform and college students.

For New York City firefighters who lost hundreds of their own on Sept. 11, firehouses erupted over the news. Some drove their trucks into the heart of Times Square this morning.

"Osama bin Laden was responsible for killing 343 members of the FDNY on Sept. 11, 2001. Tonight, in firehouses throughout the city, our members are grateful for the news, and thankful to all the brave members of the U.S. military that had a role in this successful operation," said Fire Commissioner Salvatore Cassano in a statement.

The news literally brought a Mets-Phillies game in Philadelphia to a standstill. It was announced over the loud speaker, and then the crowd started screaming, "USA...USA."

On college campuses across the nation, students too young to remember much before 9/11 put their own stamp on history.

One picture sent to "Good Morning America" from Penn State showed thousands of students pouring into the streets. More photos and video from schools like Iowa State and West Virginia show massive crowds of students cheering and waving American flags.

At West Point, cadets, not even 10 years old when the World Trade Center came down, were seen chanting across their campus.

In Dearborn, Mich., a heavily Middle Eastern suburb of Detroit, the Associated Press reported a small crowd had gathered outside the town's City Hall waving American Flags and cheering.

By morning, the celebration at Ground Zero had been replaced by construction workers rebuilding the site who were buoyant over the news of bin Laden's death.

"I can't explain it but it feels different today," said Victor Colon, a concrete laborer who laid the foundation for the Freedom Tower under construction.

"Everyone seems a little happier. They've got more motion in their step.... When you come to work here every day after every day you start to forget what happened. But today you remember why we're here."

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