Tampa Mom Julie Schenecker Was Probed for Child Abuse in Fall, But Not Charged

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Schenecker's Family Attended Al-Anon Meetings

Calyx had been in counseling for three weeks at the Children's Crisis Center in Tampa at the time of the report's filing. Schenecker claimed in the report that her daughter's behavior had changed since she started attending King High School.

Schenecker told investigators "she has had to increase her level of discipline since her daughter no longer responds to her privileges being confiscated," according to the report.

Two days after police visited the Schenecker home, the mom of two got into a car accident that sent her to the hospital.

At the scene of the car accident, the petite blonde "showed signs of drug impairment," according to a Florida Highway Patrol report.

Schenecker was charged with careless driving and forced to take classes, the Florida Highway Patrol said.

Schenecker failed to slow down, driving into a vehicle that was pulling a trailer. The trailer became unhitched and the vehicle of the person Schenecker struck ended up on a median facing oncoming traffic, according to the report. Both drivers reported injuries, according to the report.

Schenecker had "dilated pupils with no reaction to light" and "mush-mouthed speech," according to the report. She was taken to a hospital but released before investigators could take a blood sample for drug testing, the report said.

A woman who asked to remain anonymous told ABC News that the family of Schenecker attended an Al-Anon meeting three weeks ago. Al-Anon is a support group for those whose family members abuse drugs or alcohol.

Colonel Schenecker accompanied Beau and Calyx to the meeting of about 20 people, the woman said..

"He was just like any normal dad. He was there to help his kids," the woman said. "It was mentioned by the dad that they were there for the mother [Schenecker]...he said that she did have a drug and alcohol problem and they were here to cope with it."

Beau, 13, didn't speak at the meeting but 16-year-old Calyx did.

"Calyx started to speak and she started to say, 'my mom.' She said, 'my mom' maybe about twice. She couldn't say any more, she started bawling," the woman said.

The woman said she didn't see the family at another Al-Anon meeting.

"It seemed like they were dealing with a lot. I dont' think anyone knew exactly what they were dealing with. I think it was kind of hidden," she said.

Reportedly, Schenecker's mother had grown increasingly concerned about what she said was her daughter's depression.

She'd received a disturbing e-mail from her daughter the day the murders occurred complaining that the kids were talking back and the note ended with Schenecker writing, it "would all be over soon," police said.

When a call to her daughter wasn't answered Friday morning, she called police.

"She felt the note was ominous and so she contacted the Tampa Police Department," Police Spokewswoman Laura McElroy said.

After being read her Miranda Rights, police said, Schenecker confessed to shooting her son twice in the head while they were on the way to soccer practice. She told police that she then drove to the family home in a gated country club community in north Tampa, where she shot her daughter in the back of the head while the teen was studying at her computer, police said.

Police: Calyx, Beau 'Never Saw it Coming'

The children "never saw it coming," police spokeswoman McElroy said.

The scene was so gruesome, counselors met with officers who first responded to the home, McElroy said.

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