Blago Boycotts Impeachment Trial; Lawyer Boycotts Him

"They're perfectly fair rules," responded state Sen. Matt Murphy, calling Blagojevich's contentions "a cynical effort on the part of this governor that is perfectly consistent with his actions of the last six years."

Denouncing Blagojevich's behavior as "the theater of the absurd," Murphy said that, barring the governor's resignation, the trial would go ahead as planned, starting at noon CT on Monday.

Murphy wasn't the only Illinois politician frustrated by Blagojevich's latest round of comments. Chicago Mayor Richard Daley, when asked what he though about the governor's charge that his impeachment was about his opposition to tax increases, imitated a cuckoo clock.

The governor called on the press to help him, imploring Chicago newspapers, including the Tribune and its editorial board, to come to his aid. Federal prosecutors have alleged that Blagojevich attempted to use financial incentives to get the Tribune's owner, Sam Zell, to fire editorial staff that he found objectionable.

Not only will Blagojevich not be at Monday's trial, but neither will his attorneys, Ed Genson and Sam Adam, who have also said they don't want to participate in an "unfair" trial. A deadline passed earlier this week for the governor to request documents, witnesses or other materials in his defense.

Genson, according to media reports, has said he expects the senate to impeach the governor. He did not return messages left today by ABCNews.com.

Blagojevich also gave an interview this morning on WLS 890 AM, in which he lobbed similar charges against Senate leaders.

He likened his impending impeachment trial to a to the "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" movie plot, saying he's the good guy who's fighting for the people.

"This is a 21st century Frank Capra movie," Blagojevich said. "How the good guy was up against the establishment and yet they tried to make him look like he had violated rules."

Blagojevich told WLS that he couldn't say if he'd still be governor in two weeks, but that his mental state was "solid" and he's grateful for the support he's received from his family and ordinary citizens.

"Out of bad things," he said, "good things come."

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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