Dozens of American Fugitives on the Lam in Cuba

While fugitives like Chesimard and Gerena are living deep underground in Cuba, others live normal lives there.

In January, William Potts, a hijacker who arrived in Cuba from New York, gave an interview to CNN in which he said he wanted to return to the U.S. and receive a pardon from President Obama.

Potts served a 13-year prison term in Cuba after he arrived in the country in 1984. Today, he lives with his family on the outskirts of Havana.

Robert Vesco, who Slate magazine called "the undisputed king of the fugitive financiers" was perhaps the richest fugitive to take refuge in Cuba and was one of a few not associated with revolutionary activist groups.

Vesco fled to Cuba in 1982 after a series of allegations brought against him in the U.S. and throughout the Caribbean. He was accused of stealing some $200 million from investors in the 1970s and making an illegal contribution to Richard Nixon's 1972 presidential campaign.

Fugitives in Cuba Waiting for Relations to Improve

After receiving the protection of the Cuban government, Vesco was sentenced to prison in Havana in 1996 and died from lung cancer in Havana in 2007.

"Many of [the fugitives] have just tried to lay low," said Gallardo. "They hope that if relations improve and if a treaty is worked out, we'll start to exchange folks."

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