Andrew Conley Says He Was Inspired by 'Dexter' to Strangle Brother

VIDEO: Twitter page, YouTube profile reveal the dark thoughts of the 15-year-old girl.
Share
Copy

An Indiana teen who has allegedly admitted strangling his little brother likened the murder to satisfying a craving for a hamburger and told authorities he was inspired by the television series "Dexter."

Anthony Conley, 17, is charged with murdering his 10-year-old brother Conner on Saturday night, allegedly strangling the boy and then stuffing his head in a plastic bag so that blood wouldn't "get everywhere," according to Dearborn-Ohio County Prosecutor Aaron Negangard.

"It's disturbing that a 17-year-old would want to kill under any circumstances, let alone his own brother," said Negangard. He described Conley as "emotionless" when he was interviewed by police.

VIDEO: Twitter page, YouTube profile reveal the dark thoughts of the 15-year-old girl.
null

According to Negangard, Conley turned himself into authorities the day after he allegedly murdered his brother. But the night before, Conley said he stopped at his girlfriend's home to give her a "sweetheart ring." The couple also watched the movie "The Green Mile," which focuses on the lives of prison guards on death row.

"His girlfriend described him as the happiest he had been in a long while," said Negangard.

Conley's lawyer, Gary Sorge, was not available for comment. Conley, who was scheduled to appear in court today, is being held without bail at Switzerland County Jail in Vevay.

Nobody answered calls made to the Conley's Rising Sun, Ind., home.

Teens Alleges He Was Inspired by TV Serial Killer Dexter Morgan

Negangard said that when Conley was asked to explain his behavior by investigators the teen said he identified with Dexter Morgan, the main character in Showtime's "Dexter," which chronicles the life of an undercover Miami blood spatter expert who doubles as a serial killer.

"Conley said that he just 'felt like him,'" said Negangard.

Reached for comment, a Showtime spokesperson had no comment.

This is the second murder that was allegedly inspired by "Dexter." Last year, a 29-year-old Canadian man Mark Twitchell mimicked a story line from the drama when he allegedly killed 39-year-old Johnny Altinger. Twitchell was dubbed a "fervid fan" of the show in local reports.

Melissa Rosenberg, the show's executive producer, told Canwest News Service at the time that this was a "worst fears" situation, and one that the show's creators "worried about from the beginning."

In interviews with investigators, Conley also allegedly likened his desire to kill to a craving a person gets when they want a particular food.

"He analogized the murder to when someone wants a hamburger," said Negangard. "He said that when someone wants a hamburger they've just got to have it."

Conley allegedly admitted to strangling his brother on Saturday night when their parents were both at work. Stuffing his brother's dead body in the back of his car, he then drove to his girlfriend's house where he spent the night.

Sometime the next day, authorities said Conley dumped his brother's body in a park just a few hundred yards from where the 10-year-old attended elementary school.

The next morning Conley was asked by his parents – both of whom Negangard said work night shifts – where his little brother was. Conley told his parents that his little brother was at his grandmother's home, which is apparently not unusual.

But when asked to pick up his brother a few hours later, Conley drove to the police station and turned himself in.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Year In Pictures
Damien Meyer/AFP/Getty Images
PHOTO: James Franco and Seth Rogen in The Interview.
Ed Araquel/Sony/Columbia Pictures/AP Photo
PHOTO: Patrick Crawford is pictured in this photo from his Facebook page.
Meteorologist Patrick Crawford KCEN/Facebook
PHOTO: George Stinney Jr., the youngest person ever executed in South Carolina, in 1944, is seen in this undated file photo.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History/AP Photo