Strict, Controversial Parenting Style Leads to Death Threats for 'Tiger Mother' Amy Chua

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Waldman, who is also the author of the memoir "Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities, and Occasional Moments of Grace," told of her reaction to Chua's Wall Street Journal piece and the fact that every author need to remain accountable for what they write.

"I think it's important when you write something like this that you own all parts of it. Having gone through my own trial of fire with the media on motherhood issues … You can't back away from it. You can say this is me, this is what I wrote, but if you want to get the whole story, buy the book," Waldman told ABC News.

"You don't see her journey [in the Wall Street Journal piece], you don't see her transformation. I think there's surely more to the story there," Waldman said.

Meanwhile, Chua, 48, responded to and clarified what the Wall Street Journal published.

Chua Acknowledges Mistakes

In an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle, Chua stated that the Wall Street Journal's article strung together the most controversial sections of her book and failed to highlight that the book is a memoir about a personal journey of motherhood.

"I was very surprised," she told the Chronicle's Jeff Yang. "They didn't even hint that the book is about a journey, and that the person at beginning of the book is different from the person at the end -- that I get my comeuppance and retreat from this very strict Chinese parenting model."

"I'm not going to retract my statements about Chinese parenting. But I'd also note that I'm aware now of the limitations of that model -- that it doesn't incorporate enough choice.

"I now believe there's a hybrid way of parenting that combines the two paradigms, but it took me making a lot of mistakes along the way to get there," said Chua.

Waldman's point of view on parenting, it turns out, is actually somewhat similar to where Chua landed after her parenting journey.

"Sometimes when I try to use a stern attitude -- 'I'm your mother and you will do what I say' -- it doesn't work as much. Sometimes I provide as much emotional support as I can -- and sometimes that works.

"I sort of throw everything that I can at the problem, and hope that something will work out," Waldman said.

ABC News' Suzan Clarke contributed to this report.

Click here to return to the "Good Morning America" website.

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