Health Care Endgame: Obama, Dems Duel Over Deadline

Meanwhile, House and Senate Democrats continue to negotiate intensely on writing a compromise bill, the drafting of which in committee could happen as soon as Friday.

Late Wednesday, Democrats emerged from a closed door meeting and said they were close to an agreement on a compromise bill that could pass both the House and the Senate.

Outside Washington, a fired-up Obama took a campaign-like tone to urge Congress to vote "yes" on health care reform.

"I believe Congress owes the American people a final up or down vote on health care reform. The time for talk is over. It's time to vote," the president said in the battleground state of Missouri, where he was campaigning for Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo. "We are not backing down, we are not quitting and we are going to get this done," he shouted.

As the fight for health care reform enters its final throes, the health care insurance industry is pledging up to $10 million to help defeat the proposal.

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius went into the belly of the beast, speaking to insurance executives at their conference at the Ritz-Carlton in Washington, D.C., to propose a different path.

Rather than spend money attacking the parts of the legislation they oppose, Sebelius said they should come to the table and help in "strengthening the parts that are there that you talked about from the beginning are essential comprehensive reform."

Abortion, Special Deals Remain Final Sticking Points to Get House Democrats on Board

Away from the microphones and cameras, Democrats are strategizing about how to get a majority of House Democrats to support the bill that passed the Senate.

Obama has told Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., to remove from the final compromise bill all the special deals that were cut to secure the support of individual lawmakers -- not just the ones for Sen. Ben Nelson, D-Neb., and Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., that had been previously announced as on the chopping block.

One problem is that many anti-abortion Democrats do not like the somewhat less restrictive language on abortion in the Senate bill.

One solution would restore the more restrictive language, but some anti-abortion Republicans have said they would vote with abortion rights supporters to torpedo the whole deal, just to kill the health care bill.

Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., said he would vote against the bill, regardless of which language is chosen.

"It won't happen because pro-life members like me, I won't vote for it. So you have large numbers of pro-life members who will never vote for it," Coburn, a doctor, said.

ABC News' Jake Tapper and Jonathan Karl contributed to this report.

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