The Conversation: Journey to the Top of the Volcano

VIDEO: Diane Sawyer and Neal Karlinsky discuss his journey to the top of the volcano

While it is hard to find someone who can pronounce the name of the Iceland volcano, Eyjafjallajokull, it's much more difficult to find someone who hasn't been captivated by its spewing ash and affect on air travel. Across the globe, people have felt the effects of the volcano first hand, as they sit stranded in airport terminals or their businesses are held hostage by halted deliveries. For others it has hit even closer to home, with ash raining down on the villages surrounding the glacier volcano.

In today's Conversation Diane Sawyer spoke with Neal Karlinsky who had just landed after a trip to the top of the volcano. Karlinsky stood downwind of the plume, just a few hundred yards away from the center of the crater. Karlinsky spoke to Sawyer about the powerful, blistering cold winds, and the sensation of standing on a glacier that is now covered in ash. Karlinsky has spent the last few days traveling around Iceland, watching families do their best to protect themselves and their homes from ash. In some parts of Iceland the ash is so heavy that it blocks out the sun, making 3 p.m. in the afternoon seem like the middle of the night.

Take the most in depth look yet at the volcano now at the center of a massive air shut down.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 10414615.
null
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: A home damaged by a landslide Friday, April 18, 2014 in Jackson, Wyo. is shown in this aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental.
Tributary Environmental/AP Photo
null
Danny Martindale/Getty Images
PHOTO: Woman who received lab-grown vagina says she now has normal life.
Metropolitan Autonomous University and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine