Barbara Walters Returns to 'The View'

ABC News' David Muir talks with Walters about her comeback.
3:02 | 03/04/13

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Transcript for Barbara Walters Returns to 'The View'
And it is great tonight to welcome back a special member of our abc family, barbara walters, who was back on "the view" this morning. And tonight, she has a very personal conversation about what she faced in her month away, as abc's david muir went behind the scenes to talk about what happened and the souvenir it left behind. Reporter: After six weeks off the air, barbara walters is back. You are treating me like -- be careful, don't walk too fast. Just in case. I am fine. Reporter: When this all began, barbara had no idea she'd come dock with the chicken pox. She traveled to washington not knowing. There, she felt woozy and she fell, which led to that severe concussion. So, today, after a lot of scratching and rest, I am fine and I am healthy. Good. Reporter: Backstage at "the view" today, we would learn a lot more. Welcome back. I'm fine. You want me to kiss you or you think I'm still contagious. On . Reporter: Only if we're rolling. Barbara now hoping to talk to others about chicken pox. The cdc estimates just 1 in 10,000 adults gets it every year. I have a friend who had shingles. And from the shingles, I got the chicken pox, because you can get that if you've never had it. I didn't know. I had a temperature. To their amazement, they found chicken pox? Reporter: Barbara never had chicken pox as a child and doctors later revealing she was likely walking around with a 102 degree fever, which then led to that fall. And it was that concussion that truly concerned doctors most. Lots of attention on concussions. People hear about them every day, but it's a serious thing. It is a serious thing. If it does not go away, sometimes you have to have surgery. And the only treatnt for it is rest and then you have c.A.T. Scans to see what's going on in your head. Reporter: Barbaras doctor conducted several scans, most concerned with what sometimes comes with a severe concussion. Blood near the brain. Which is why they made her rest for six weeks. She did not have any complications with her vision, as we saw with hillary clinton's concussion. But she did get an e-mail -- chelsea clinton e-mailed me? Yes, and said, I'm going to get my mother and you helmets. Reporter: On the air today, she revealed most of her pock marks have heeled. I have one -- can you see it? No, you can't see it. And I have a scar. Reporter: Backstage, her trademark humor returned, too. You know, people have told me, sometimes, that I should have my head examined. Well -- I have. Reporter: Several times now. More than I needed. Reporter: And she's looking good. Barbara told us today this all began with a new year's hug from a well-known actor who she said shall remain nameless. He was about to develop shingles. As you heard, diane, the biggest concern all along was the concussion. And barbara said the best side effect, though? Doctors have told her she doesn't have to get on the treadmill for some time. Well, it's just great to have her back. No kidding.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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