Firefighter Wears Helmet Camera Into Intense Fires

Michigan firefighter shoots point-of-view videotape of comrades in action.
2:12 | 01/16/13

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Transcript for Firefighter Wears Helmet Camera Into Intense Fires
Finally tonight, the story of a real hometown hero. Firefighters across this country face so many dangerous decisions, we cannot imagine what it is they do every day. So, one young firefighter put a camera on his helmet for a solid year, so that we could be there with them in the heat and the treachery of a blazing fire. And here's abc's john schriffen. Reporter: This is what it's like to walk into a burning house. The first thing you feel? The scorching heat. Temperatures can reach more than 500 degrees. You feel the heat right through your fire suit. Inside? It's noisy. It's disorienting. The smoke in your eyes. One of the big fears is beneath your feet. While you take each step, will the floor give way? If you're not safe, then you can't really do a good job for the people you're supposed to be helping out. That is always in your mind. Reporter: For a full year, 27-year-old scott zeigler filmed his day job, with a camera mounted on his helmet, capturing blaze after blaze near detroit, michigan. He's been a firefighter since he was a teenager. He says his mother worries about him. He said he wanted to show people what it's really like inside a burning building. At a time when his department and others around the country are being forced to fight more fires with fewer resources. Looking at it, you can kind of tell. That looks pretty dangerous -- because it is. If they can take anything away from it, maybe they know a firefighter or maybe the town they live in is talking about cutting their funding. Maybe they can look at that video and think, well, those guys do a pretty dangerous job. It seems to be that they might need more people than less. Reporter: It's a unique perspective, with unique lessons to be learned. He says it's crucial to plan ahead. People should have floor plans to their house, teach their kids, if your house catches on fire, you know, run drills so they can get out of that house and not worry about anything else. Get out and wait for help. Help coming from zeigler and thousands of firefighters who put their lives at risk every day, and then come back for more. John schriffen, abc news, new york.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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