Six Flags Roller Coaster Reopens After Grandmother's Deadly Fall in July

Rosa Esparza's family detailed what happened the day she fell 75 feet to her death.
1:59 | 09/11/13

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Transcript for Six Flags Roller Coaster Reopens After Grandmother's Deadly Fall in July
Tonight we are finally hearing some details about the grandmother who fell out of a roller coaster at a theme park near dallas, that terrifying fall to her death. The roller coaster is about to re-open at six flags this weekend as the family of that one is raising questions. Here's abc's ryan owens. Reporter: This is what it's like to ride on the texas giant, a 14 story roller coaster that twists and turns at more than 60 miles per hour. It was deadly for rosa esparza. On july 19 she was thrown from her seat 75 feet to her death. Tonight for the first time in a lawsuit her family details what they say happened that day. The 52-year-old grandmother was in the front left seat of the second car, no one next to her. Her son-in-law and daughter in front of her and according to the lawsuit saw her attempting to hold on for dear life. As she turned to tell her husband and tirns back, her mother is gone. Reporter: The suit claims the bar that was supposed to restrain riders didn't. Six flags replaced a limit switch, that's an indicator to show the bar is in place, in the very car in which rosa was riding because six flags found the switch to be defective. What's wrong with this ride? It doesn't have a proper restraint system. Reporter: Six flags will not comment and has never said exactly what happened but tonight insist there was no mechanical failure. Rosa esparza was 5'2" and more than 200 pounds. The attorney representing her family says it's still not clear whether that safety bar locked or if the bar wasn't properly designed to hold in someone her size. They're redesigning the seatbelts and placing a sample of the seat at the entrance so people can make sure they fit inside. They point out they provide 200 million safe rides every year. Ryan owens, abc news, dallas.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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