Gear Company Tackles Football Injuries Head On

ABC News investigates the push for safer helmets and risks of concussions.
3:00 | 02/03/13

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Transcript for Gear Company Tackles Football Injuries Head On
abc news investigation on this super bowl sunday. So many parents with their own children who are aspiring football stars. But there is growing concern about concussions on the field and their long-term damage. Tonight terry moran on one company's product. Can it protect against concussions? Reporter: Jennifer brannen is like a lot of moms whose sons play football. She worries about head injuries but supports tyler, her boy. As a mom, you may want to put bubble wrap around them and protect them forever, but that's not going to happen. Reporter: Now a burgeoning cottage industry has emerged online and in stores selling products to parents and players who are worried about the risk of football concussions. One company unequal technologies has risen to the fore, with nfl endorsements -- I don't feel like I'm taking a risk. Reporter: And three blunt words on the box, concussion reduction technology. Rob vito is the founder and ceo. These athletes need to take control of their own safety. Reporter: His products strips of a composite material including bulletproof kevlar that you glue into the helmet. But some experts are skeptical. The guy would have you believe it's his magical material. There's nothing magical about it. Reporter: Dave halstead is technical director at the southern impact research center, one of the leading testing labs for sports equipment in the nation. Here's the problem -- the modern football helmet already offers excellent protection against direct hits, which produce sharp linear forces against the skull. Halstead's testing shows the unequal strips show it can reduce the severity from certain angles like the front but not from other angles.D doctors believe many football concussions today are caused by shearing rotational forces when the head snaps back and swerves around on the neck and the brain slams against the inside of the skull. There is no proof that products like unequal technology's strips protects against those injuries, the ones suspected of frequently causing concussions. So you say concussion reduction technology. Is that what you're doing? Our claim is that we help reduce the possibility of head injury. That's our claim. We never mention the word "concussion." Reporter: Concussion reduction technology. Exactly. That's the name of the product. Rter: But you're claiming that it reduces concussions or that's the name of your product? Mm-hmm. Reporter: It doesn't. We're not claiming that. Reporter: Even though your product is called concussion reduction technology? Correct. But we're not claiming that. One is a name and one is a claim. And our claim is that we help reduce the possibility of head injury. Reporter: After that interview, the company changed its packaging, actually removing the words "concussion reduction technology" from the box. David, it's now just called crt. They changed the labeling after your "nightline" investigation. But in the meantime, this is a real concern for parents. It would seem that products like these play into the fears of parents who just really want to make their kids safe. Absolutely. Parents need to read the fine print on these products, see what they're actually claiming. Learn about concussions to see what science understands about them. And most important, perhaps, advocate for rules changes that will keep our kids safer. You've been looking into all these products and there is no magic bullet. There is no magic bullet for this problem.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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