The story behind a 'Made in America' spicy treat

Refugee David Tran could not find the hot sauces he grew up with in Vietnam, which led him to make Sriracha in 1980.
2:10 | 02/15/17

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Transcript for The story behind a 'Made in America' spicy treat
Finally tonight here, made in America. The wildly popular spicy ingredient harvested right here in California. And the refugee who came to America decades ago determined to create the hot sauce he left behind for his new home. Reporter: We walk into the bareburger burger joint. They already knew that American brand name. One word that comes to mind when you hear sriracha. It's hot. It's hot. Reporter: People know about it? Yeah, definitely. Mostly the pork belly sriracha Brussels that we have. The pork belly sriracha Brussels? So you can make even brussles sprouts -- Amazing. Reporter: They took us back to prove it. The Brussels sprouts coming out of the fryer. Just add the sriracha. And some spices. And mix it all together. The finished product. And the taste. I can taste the kick. It does make Brussels sprouts -- Fun. Reporter: A little -- fun? A little less scary! A little less scary. Reporter: A little less scary and a lot of kick from peppers. Ventura county, California. Palm trees line the way. Underwood family farms. 21 tons of these red jalapeno peppers are harvested by hundreds of workers every day here during harvest season. It's pretty important they are grown in America because this is our living and it keeps a lot of people here working. Reporter: We followed the peppers just outside L.A. Where they are mashed, mixed, bottled, and it's made in the usa. On the boxes made and shipped all over the world. This man came up with the recipe proudly holding that bottle. The refugee from Vietnam and he started making the hot sauce from back home for his new home here in America, and she says he is keeping it all American made. This is my country. I keep it from my country. Reporter: 100 workers on the line, 18,000 bottles an area. All with three words in mind. Made in America. Made in America, and my tongue is still burning. Thank you for watching here on a Wednesday from California. I'm David Muir. I'll see you back from New York tomorrow night. Good night.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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