Victims of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines Desperate for Assistance

Mother cradles her dead baby and cries as necessities like water and medicine are in high demand.
2:24 | 11/13/13

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Transcript for Victims of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines Desperate for Assistance
Next we head overseas to the philippines where tonight families are struggling to survive, desperate for food, water, shelter. Help from around the world is trickling but the slow pace is testing the human spirit. Terry moran is there. Reporter: The people are are nearing the breaking point. People of the world, please, come here. We need you. Reporter: I'm talking down one of the main roads in tacloban. It used to be fine houses and shops. It's now lined for miles with the debris of this once bustling city and with its still uncollected debt. Troops are pouring into tacloban. General paul kennedy leading the u.S. Effort told us security is a growing concern now. You're going to have probably flair-ups of violence. The longer that we drag out our ability to support them, support these communities, the more they're going to get frustrated. Reporter: But the real killer here now is disease. The children, the most vulnerable. At the shattered tacloban hospital, a mother cradled her dead infant. I just told my baby I am sorry, she says. We don't have money and we don't have anyone to help us. In a neighborhood nearby, mary rose has five children and they are all sick, feverish, hungry, lethargic. They have fever. They have fever. Hello, little one. You don't know why they're sick. Yes, I don't know. Maybe the water? Possible. Reporter: Everyone here needs clean water. There are dozens of low tech solutions being developed to clean water like disinfectant that can be dropped in a bucket or purifiers that use the sun. Right now still the fastest most effective way is what they're doing here, bringing clean water in on huge pallets. There is no time to lose and so much at stake. But the good news to report today here at the airport is the pace is picking up. It's a 24-hour operation. Planes coming in and out and the aid is really starting to flow. Food, clothing, water for a people in crises. Diane? That is good news, finally starting to flow, thank you, terry more on.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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