Man Angry Over Wife's Cruise Disappearance

ByABC News via logo

Dec. 9, 2004 — -- The husband of a Wisconsin woman who disappeared from a cruise ship off the Mexican coast is not satisfied with the investigation thus far into the incident.

"I'm still waiting for answers," John Mizener told ABC News' "Good Morning America." "Things didn't seem right, the way it came about, why things didn't get done the way I felt they should be done."

The FBI is investigating the disappearance of Annette Mizener, 37, of Waukesha. She went missing early Sunday morning from the Carnival ship Pride. She was on vacation with her parents and a 17-year-old daughter from a previous marriage.

The cruise line issued a statement saying, "Carnival extends its sincerest concern and sympathy to the family and loved ones of the missing guest. Such occurrences, while rare, are very upsetting to our company and our employees."

Mizener, who was not on the cruise, told ABC News he is frustrated at a perceived lack of information from the cruise company and a lack of witnesses to his wife's disappearance.

"All we're looking for is if anybody -- she's too magnetic -- somebody must have seen when she left the room," Mizener said. "Somebody knows something, and just please come forward, man."

The ship's crew launched a room-by-room search of the Pride after Mizener's daughter Danielle and other passengers noticed she was missing. Mizener's purse was found near a railing on one of the ship's lower decks.

Coast Guard aircraft and a Navy ship also joined in the 16-hour search for Annette Mizener before the FBI began its investigation.

"We haven't given up hope," said the Rev. Rick Kielley, a family spokesman who is pastor at Abundant Life Apostolic Church in Oconomowoc, Wis. "I'm sure that John wants everything done that can be done to find Annette or to recover her body and we'll go from there."

Mizener believes the Pride did not turn around promptly enough to search for his wife. He suspects she fell over the side of the ship -- accidentally or because of foul play -- but that she did not commit suicide.

"The media, I guess, has reported some stuff; I'd like them to come to me and say that," Mizener said. "She leaves a part of her with everybody. She loved life."

An FBI spokesman said Tuesday the possibilities of foul play, an accidental fall or an intentional jump from the ship all are being explored.

Although Carnival said disappearances from its ships are rare, another passenger, Glen Sheridan, disappeared from the Celebration near Jacksonville, Fla., in November.

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