2020 candidates and more react to Santa Clarita school shooting

The nation was rocked by yet another act of gun violence Thursday.

As the nation is left reeling with news of yet another act of gun violence at a school on Thursday, a handful of lawmakers and 2020 presidential candidates reacted to the heartbreak and renewed their calls for action on social media.

Two students died and two others were injured at a shooting at Saugus High School, in Santa Clarita, California, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.

The White House said that President Donald Trump is monitoring the reports of the school shooting and encouraged those in the area to follow the advice of local law enforcement.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a statement shortly after the news broke that he is "closely monitoring the incident at Saugus High School in Santa Clarita this morning, and my Administration is working in close coordination with local law enforcement."

"Jennifer and I extend our thoughts to the parents, families and friends of the students and faculty, and the Santa Clarita community,” he added.

Meanwhile, many of the Democratic 2020 presidential hopefuls reacted to the shocking news on Twitter, sending thoughts to those impacted and calling for change.

"My heart goes out to the Santa Clarita community as they respond to a mass shooting at a high school," Julián Castro, a Democratic presidential candidate and the former secretary of housing and urban development on President Barack Obama, said in a tweet. "We cannot accept this as normal. We must act on behalf of our children."

Fellow presidential candidate, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., also expressed her heartbreak on Twitter, writing: "Our children and communities are being terrorized. We can't accept this."

Entrepreneur Andrew Yang called the news "horrifying" and emphasized the need for action to "fight gun violence and shootings at every level."

Former Vice President Joe Biden said "prayers aren't enough" and called for "real gun reform to make our schools safer."

Author Marianne Williamson tweeted asking for "all of us who pray now pray," and for "for the strength to be the people who rise up & say 'No more!'"

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., called the news "another sad example of a school shooting."

Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Indiana, wrote that it's time to "hold the NRA and our leaders in Washington accountable."

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., shared that she is "heartsick for the victims of this horrifying shooting and their families," in a tweet. "We shouldn't have to live like this. Students shouldn't live in fear when they go to school. We must act now to end gun violence."

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-VT, wrote: "This must end."

"Children in America should not live in fear for their lives at school or anywhere else," he said in a tweet sharing the news. "We have a moral obligation to say: children's lives are more important than gun manufacturers' profits. We must pass common sense gun safety legislation."

For former Rep. Katie Hill, who just recently resigned as a congresswoman representing California, said the shooting hit very close to home. Hill tweeted that it was her high school, and she was "praying for all."

  Republican governor of Kentucky Matt Bevin reacted to the news in a Facebook post, writing: "The hearts of Kentuckians are broken today for the students, teachers, staff & families of those at Saugus High School in Santa Clarita, California."

"For those who know the power of prayer, please pray for peace that is beyond our ability to understand," Bevin added.

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina also responded to the news of another school shooting, telling reporters he is "dying to do something about this." Graham added that he spoke to the president "two or three weeks ago" about red flag laws, which would allow law enforcement to take guns away from people who show signs of violent behavior.

When asked why there has been no progress on gun legislation in the Senate for the last few months, Graham said, "I think we're waiting on the White House."