'Start Here': President Trump fumes over reported FBI campaign informant

PHOTO: President Donald Trump speaks at the East Room of the White House, May 18, 201,8 in Washington.PlayAlex Wong/Getty Images
WATCH Trump to 'look into' whether campaign was 'infiltrated'

It's Monday, May 21, 2018. Here are some of the stories we're talking about on ABC News' new daily podcast, "Start Here."

1. Informant investigation

Over the weekend, The New York Times and The Washington Post reported that during the 2016 election the FBI sent an informant to speak to Donald Trump’s campaign aides -- striking up conversations about what exactly they might know about Russian intelligence gathering.

Trump says later today he will formally demand a full investigation into whether all of this was done to keep him from winning the White House.

ABC News Senior Investigative Producer Matthew Mosk says House Republicans and the Trump legal team will be pushing the FBI for answers.

2. Making sense of another school shooting

On Friday, 10 people were killed and 13 were wounded in a school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas.

This is the sixth fatal shooting at a school since Valentine's Day when 17 students and staff were gunned down in Parkland, Florida.

In the conservative Texas town, it's unlikely we'll see the same calls for stricter gun laws. But 40 miles away in Houston, the chief of police was making that call himself.

We speak to Chief Art Acevedo about his his strongly worded Facebook post, and ask former FBI agent and ABC News Contributor Steve Gomez about the fear of "copycat killings" going forward.

PHOTO: Houston police chief Art Acevedo looks on during a press conference following a tour of the NRG Center evacuation center, Sept. 4, 2017, in Houston, Texas. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Houston police chief Art Acevedo looks on during a press conference following a tour of the NRG Center evacuation center, Sept. 4, 2017, in Houston, Texas.

3. Calming the China trade war

When Trump promised to institute big tariffs on China this year, the country was quick to respond.

The U.S said we're going hit you where it hurts: Chinese technology exports.

The Chinese said we're going to hit the U.S. and Trump where it hurts: farmers who send billions of dollars in goods across the Pacific. Talk of a trade war escalated, and farmers asked the White House to figure this out.

Well on Sunday, Trump administration officials said let's all calm down a bit.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Fox News they are putting the trade war "on hold" after a summit between the countries' economic advisers late last week. However, those tariffs were apparently not on the table.

What was on the agenda was the sky-high trade imbalance between the countries.

Megan Greene, chief economist at Manulife and John Hancock Asset Management, says what really is at issue here is a fight over artificial intelligence.

PHOTO: White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow speaks during a television interview outside the West Wing of the White House, in Washington, May 18, 2018. Carolyn Kaster/AP Photo
White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow speaks during a television interview outside the West Wing of the White House, in Washington, May 18, 2018.

4. 'Bikram'

Bikram yoga, a type of hot yoga, has spread around the country since it surfaced in Los Angeles in the early 1970s, but in 2013, women began coming forward to accuse founder Bikram Choudhury of sexual misconduct and abuse.

We have an early look at the new podcast "Bikram" from our partners at ESPN's "30 for 30" set to launch tomorrow. Julia Lowrie Henderson reported on the story and she tells us about her interviews with Choudhury's alleged victims and what happened when she spoke to the disgraced guru, who fled to Mexico.

PHOTO: Bikram Choudhury speaks at Riverside Church, May 22, 2010 in New York City. Johnny Nunez/WireImage/Getty Images
Bikram Choudhury speaks at Riverside Church, May 22, 2010 in New York City.

5. New bathroom policy at Starbucks

Ever since two black men were arrested at a Philadelphia Starbucks last month for sitting inside while they waited for a friend, the coffee chain has been under pressure to address the issue at the corporate level.

This weekend, the company reportedly put out new guidelines telling managers to let people sit where they want, and use the bathroom when they want regardless of whether they've paid for anything.

"Any person who enters our spaces is considered a customer," the memo reads.

The new policy also tells employees to only dial 911 if a customer presents an immediate danger to others.

"Start Here" is a daily ABC News podcast hosted by Brad Mielke featuring original reporting on stories that are driving the national conversation. Listen for FREE on the ABC News app, Apple Podcasts, TuneIn, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play Music, iHeartRadio -- or ask Alexa: "Play 'Start Here.'"

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