Bank CEOs: The Men Behind the Billions

Kelly, 54, is forgoing his 2008 bonus, according to a bank representative. But like many of the other executives who run banks that have received funding, he has come under increased scrutiny for a large salary and corporate perks that some argue are being bought with taxpayers' dollars.

Kelly's stipend for financial planning services came to $66,748 in 2007, on top of his multimillion-dollar bonus and nearly $1 million salary. His car and driver cost $178,879 and he received $846,000 in relocation expenses, including help selling his home in Pittsburgh and purchasing one in Manhattan, the company told the AP.

BNY Mellon will receive $3 billion in TARP aid and earn an additional $20 million to provide accounting, record keeping and administrative services to help the Treasury Department monitor how the money is being allocated.

Of the 15 companies hired by the government to handle accounting and administrative work, BNY Mellon received the largest contract.

Kelly became CEO of the bank in 2007, when Mellon merged with the Bank of New York.

Ronald E. Logue, chairman and chief executive officer, State Street Corp.

2007 Compensation: Salary of $1 million plus nearly $3.8 million bonus and $22.7 million in stock awards.
State Street Corp. TARP Funding: $2 billion

State Street CEO Ronald Logue

Amid major investment losses and slashed dividends, Logue joined other banking executives in rejecting bonus pay.

Las week, Logue announced that he and four other State Street executives would forgo their 2008 bonuses and that bonuses for the rest of the company would be cut in half.

"Given that we are asking our shareholders to make sacrifices through dividend reductions, we believe that we must also be willing to make our own sacrifices," Logue said in a statement last week.

Of the nine major financial institutions that were first on the list for TARP funding, State Street Bank has the distinction of receiving the smallest investment -- $ 2 billion. But like its peers, State Street has been hit hard by the financial crisis, posting billions in losses late last year.

Logue, 60, joined State Street in 1990 as a senior vice president. He served as chief operating officer and president before being named CEO in 2004.

ABC News' Matt Jaffe and Reynolds Holding contributed to this report.

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