Clark Sorensen
  • Sculptor Clark Sorensen, seen here in his San Francisco studio in 2005. The artist is racing right now to complete eight new urinals in time for Thursday's opening of the annnual Pacific Orchid Exposition. In keeping with the show's theme this year ("Orchids And All That Jazz"), one of Sorensen's urinals will be in the shape of a saxophone.
    Erin O'Neill
  • Clark Sorensen's daffodil-inspired urinal. Many of the artist's bathroom works--all of them plumbed to be fully-functional--sell for just under $8,000. His most expensive urinal to date was priced at $14,000.
    Clark Sorensen
  • It almost seems a crime to use it: This Pitcher Plant urinal operates without water, thanks to a Urimat hydrostatic siphon trap. Sorensen creates his sculptures in a basement studio in San Francisco's Mission District.
    Clark Sorensen
  • This Red Hibiscus Urinal with pedestal retails for $7,900. Sorensen says many of his customers are women whose husbands want a home urinal. "The conversation goes like this," he says: The husband says, I want a urinal. The wife says, No way--only if it's something special or beautiful. "And then," says Sorensen, "They find me."
    Clark Sorensen
  • Yellow Orchid Urinal by Clark Sorensen, price $8,900. A rare beauty that captures the colors of its original, with green-veined, pale yellow petals. Sorensen says his works are "inspired by nature (and the call of it)."
    Clark Sorensen
  • Nautilus Shell Urinal. "Because most people think of a urinal as being ugly or dirty, it is the perfect object to beautify," says Sorensen. "My works echo the classic conflicts between masculine and feminine, good and evil, soiled and chaste."
    Clark Sorensen
  • In a word: Yikes! The Venus Fly Trap Urinal ($11,500) lies patiently in wait for the unwary micturant, who, in his moment of relief, too late discovers himself trapped in its murderous embrace. Or something like that. Says Sorensen's description: "This carniverous plant comes with a full set of spikes. They look dangerous but are made of friendly silicone rubber."
    Clark Sorensen
  • This picture. taken in Hong Kong, Feb. 24, 2005, shows a 24-carat solid gold toilet owned by the Hang Fung Gold Technology Group and part of a display of other solid-gold washroom fixtures and accessories. Value $4.8 million USD.
    Mike ClarkeAFP/Getty Images
  • Perhaps the most famous (and certainly the most valuable) urinal of the 20th century: 'Fountain' by surealist artist Marcel Duchamp was first displayed in 1917. The fate of the original is unknown, but copies (some authorized by the artist, some not) began popping up following WWII. An official copy sold at auction in 1999 for $1.8 million.
    Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
  • Holding 71 gallons of water, this Archeo solid copper bathtub by Kallista starts at $45,000. Ordinarily, your tub washes you. But the situation is more ambiguous for the copper tub owner. "While Kallista luxury finishes plate to a greater thickness, they are still jewelry finishes and requrie special maintenance," says the product literature. "We recommend that you rinse away any traces of soap and gently dry with a clean soft cloth after each use."
    Kallista
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