Jackson's Family Wants Answers From Doctor

Los Angeles police have a few questions for Dr. Conrad Robert Murray, the cardiologist and "personal physician" who was by pop icon Michael Jackson's side on the day of his death.

The police aren't the only ones. Jackson's parents and siblings have some questions of their own, according to the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a longtime friend of the family.

Rev. Jackson, who spent Friday with the Jacksons, spoke to ABC News about their concerns about the doctor and his role in Michael's final hours.

Rev. Jackson confirmed that the family is suspicious.

The fact that the doctor had left the scene, was not available to sign the death certificate or answer the family's questions about their son's final moments did sit right at all with the Jacksons, according to Rev. Jackson.

VIDEO: Jacksons doctor talks to police
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"When did the doctor come? What did he do? Did he inject him? If so, with what?" said Rev. Jackson. "Was he on the scene twice? Before and then reaction to? Did he use the Demerol? It's a very powerful drug. Was he injected once? Was he injected twice?"

Rev. Jackson also said the family is considering and will "probably" order a second independent autopsy.

Dr. Murray has arranged legal representation and is expected to speak with the police this weekend.

Los Angeles Police Deputy Chief Charlie Beck said Friday in a press conference that the robbery/homicide division has been in contact with Dr. Murray and would be interviewing him soon.

Police said interviewing the attending physician was a standard part of the investigation.

"A doctor has yet to sign to the Jackson death certificate," said LAPD spokesman Richard French. "Part of the investigation involves interviewing the attending physician."

Police believe Murray could provide a critical clue in determining what killed Michael Jackson.

Cops towed a silver BMW from outside Jackson's Los Angeles home, which police confirmed belonged to Jackson's "personal physician" and which they believed contains evidence crucial to the investigation.

Law enforcement sources, however, confirmed to ABC News, that the car towed from Jackson's home is registered to one Susan Mary Rush. Rush is the sister of Dr. Conrad Robert Murray.

"The car was impounded," said Amanda Betat, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles Police Department. "One reason it was impounded was because it may contain medication or evidence that could assist the coroner in determining the cause of death."

Law enforcement sources told ABC newsJackson was addicted to Oxycontin and received it and Demerol in daily doses.

The Los Angeles County coroner's office announced it concluded Jackson's autopsy at 4 p.m. PT today, but the determination of the cause of the pop star's death has been deferred because the medical examiner ordered additional toxicology, neuropathology and pulmonary tests. Craig Harvey, operations chief of the L.A. County coroner's office, said the tests will take four to six weeks to complete, at which time he anticipates being able to issue a final cause of death.

Jackson's brother Jermaine said Thursday night at a press conference that the singer's doctor had tried to resuscitate him.

"His personal physician, who was with him at the time, attempted to resuscitate my brother, as did the paramedics who transported him to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center," Jermaine Jackson said in the announcement that confirmed Michael Jackson, 50, had died.

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