Hugh Jackman Opens Up About Battle With Skin Cancer

PHOTO: Hugh Jackman at the Broadway opening of "After Midnight" in New York, Nov. 3, 2013.

Hugh Jackman just revealed last week his second bout with cancer, now he's explaining why he is pleading with people to wear sun screen and get checked out.

"We are all human, this happened to me, I didn't wear sun screen when I was a kid," he told ABC News at the "X-Men: Days of Future Past" premiere over the weekend. "I don't want kids to be as stupid as me and maybe they'll listen to Wolverine more than they'll listen to teachers at school."

In fact, Jackman thinks he's lucky where others might not be.

Read: Hugh Jackman Reveals 2nd Bout of Skin Cancer

"It's all preventable. I was lucky to be in a job, where I have makeup artists looking at my face, going, 'What is that?'" he added. "And my wife nagging me to go and get it checked out."

The 45-year-old actor had revealed on his Instagram account on Thursday that he had to have another spot of skin cancer removed. Jackman posted a picture of himself with a bandage over his nose to cover up the spot where the cancer spot was removed. His fans are happy the actor seems to be doing all right and are sharing their well-wishes on his photo.

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“Another Basel Cell Carsinoma [sic]. All out now,” The “X-Men” star captioned the photo. “Thanks Dr. Albom and Dr. Arian. PLEASE! PLEASE! WEAR SUNSCREEN!”

This comes after the Australian actor had a basal-cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, removed from almost the same location on his nose just six months ago, which he also shared via Instagram.

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