5 Takeaways From Funny Or Die's Donald Trump Movie

PHOTO: Johnny Depp appears as Donald Trump in the parody "Funny Or Die Presents Donald Trumps The Art Of The Deal: The Movie."PlayFunnyordie.com
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So, this happened. Funny or Die has made a Donald Trump biopic based on his 1987 book "The Art of the Deal" and it stars Oscar-nominated actor Johnny Depp as the presidential candidate.

The 50-minute video is streaming now on the site and Funny or Die co-founder Adam McKay, who is also nominated for an Oscar for Best Director this year, spoke to The New York Times about how the cast and crew were able to film this movie without anyone knowing.

"It was a crazy, completely nuts idea that somehow we pulled off," McKay told The Times.

Ron Howard narrates the film. The movie is grainy and shot as if it takes place in the 1980s, when Trump's book first hit store shelves. Depp was able to film the movie over a few days this past December, The Times said.

This movie comes on the heels of Trump's big win at the New Hampshire Republican presidential primary last night.

Here are 5 takeaways from the outlandish film:

Movie of the Week Setting Is Brilliant

“Thought to be lost in the Cybill Shepherd blouse fire of 1989." That's how Howard explains why this movie never came to light until now. Howard adds that Trump was mad that Monday Night Football was broadcast before the film, thus cancelling its original airing date.

The movie apparently turned up at a yard sale, where Howard found it and decided to share with the world. The film begins like an after-school special, with a kid stealing Trump's book and “accidentally” running into his office. “That is a hell of a book,” Trump says, seeing the kid holding it.

“Holy cowabunga, you’re Donald Trump,” the kid says, adding that all the stores are sold out of the book, hence why he stole it. Trump then takes the kid in while he makes business deals, kind of mentoring this young mind. Things eventually take a strange, morbid turn.

Depp’s Trump Voice Isn't Half Bad

Depp uses classic Trump lines like “Huge” and other Trumpisms like “This is a snooze, I’m going to fall asleep." He even calls the Bible "boring."

“Getting [the Taj Mahal, which the movie focuses on] would take more than my normal genius deal-making superpowers. It would take the 'Art of the Deal,'” Depp says as Trump. “This is that story, in movie form, based on my best-selling book which was in best-selling book form. This is the art of the deal, OK?”

The movie is all about Trump getting a chance at “immortality” by buying the Taj from Merv Griffin, played by Patton Oswalt.

Tip cards grace the screen at different times like “Use Your Leverage” and “Fight Back” after Trump explains and shows how he wheels and deals other people out of things he wants for himself.

Hidden Eggs Galore

Robert Durst, Marla Maples and more are mentioned, all alluding to future events yet to happen during the alleged “filming” of this movie in the 1980s.

“You are no longer a registered Democrat,” Trump’s secretary tells him at one point. O.J. Simpson is also brought up. The jokes go on and on.

This is NOT Safe for Work

There are stereotypes involving Jewish people, homelessness and racial discrimination. Trump also mentions STDs and other things of a sexual nature.

“If I owned that building, I would never have allowed those rich, white men to adopt those black children,” Depp says in one scene at a night club.

“It just seems like whoever has the most money and the most Jewish lawyers has an unfair advantage,” the young boy says in another scene, after learning from Trump.

The young boy, whose name is Jose, is eventually replaced in favor of another kid and yet another.

The Stars, So Many Stars

Depp, Oswalt, Howard, Jack McBrayer as Trump’s architect, Henry Winkler as former mayor Ed Koch, Andy Richter as former NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle, Alfred Molina and even Jacob Trembly. Stephen Merchant plays Barron Hilton in another scene on how Trump bested a rival family.

How McCay and his team were able to secretly get all these stars and film this movie without any media leaks is a "huge" question.

The music comes to you from Kenny Loggins and The Fat Boys, which also ain’t too shabby.

Alf is also Trump's best man at his 1977 wedding to Ivana.

ABC News has reached out to Trump's team for comment.