How the live-action 'Beauty and the Beast' is different from the original

PHOTO: Emma Watson and Dan Stevens in the movie, "Beauty and the Beast," 2017.PlayIMDB
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"Beauty and the Beast" is still a "tale as old as time," but the new live-action version has a modern twist.

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With the film hitting theaters nationwide today, starring Emma Watson and Dan Stevens, there are a lot of fans of the 1991 animated classic that are wondering how updated and different this version actually is. Easy answer -- quite a bit.

While this adaptation is sure to bring a bit of nostalgia for Disney fans, there are still some major surprises and new aspects that will delight fans young and old. Here are the top five differences between the animated version and 2017 adaptation.

MINOR SPOILERS AHEAD

New songs – including one by the Beast!

You’ll notice some slight adjustments in most of the songs, but you’ll still be able to sing along to your favorite "Beauty and the Beast" tunes. We are all too familiar with Belle’s iconic song, "Little Town," but now the Beast is belting out one of his own. Written by Josh Groban, the new original song titled "Evermore" is performed by the Stevens, who plays the Beast.

“I was able to get a sense of the intent of what this song means to the Beast and it was a great dot in the art for the Beast to share that loneliness, to share that romantic longing that he has but is kind of afraid to show,” Groban said.

Disney fans are also in for another treat. Celine Dion makes a return on the soundtrack with the song "How Does a Moment Last Forever," which is played during the final credits.

PHOTO: Beauty and the Beast (1991).Disney
Beauty and the Beast (1991).

A new character

Don’t worry, all your favorite characters are still in the live-action remake, but you’ll have a new character to add to that list. Introducing Maestro Cadenza, a musician who becomes a harpsichord grand piano in the film. He’s married to Madame Garderobe, aka the Wardrobe.

Stanley Tucci joined the cast as Cadenza and Audra McDonald takes on the role of Garderobe. Tucci, who was excited to take on the new role, had one stipulation -- singing. “I said yes of course … as long as I don’t have to sing,” he said on "Good Morning America."

PHOTO: Beauty and the Beast (1991).Disney
Beauty and the Beast (1991).

Tucci didn’t get a break completely, as he does end up singing a few lines. Keep your eyes on Cadenza toward the end of the film; he’s a big part of an interaction between the villagers and the Beast’s staff.

New backstories

Many "Beauty and the Beast" fans had lingering questions about Belle’s mother, who's barely mentioned in the animated film. Well, after more than 25 years, your burning questions will be answered.

We won’t completely spoil the movie for you but with the help of the Beast and an enchanted book, Belle goes back in time to discover not only about her mother but how her father ended up in the poor provincial town. Grab your tissues for that scene.

On another note, you’ll also get to know more about the young prince who transformed into the Beast. The movie also gives us a peek at the prince’s life a child and how his upbringing led him to become so cruel.

Gaston is more of a villain

Gaston, who is played by Luke Evans, is the character everyone loves to hate. The character in the live action isn’t just a narcissist, he’s cruel. He leaves a major character for dead and turns on another.

The Enchantress and the rose

In the animated version, the Enchantress is in the prologue of the movie with her portrait etched out in stained glass. In the live-action remake, we are introduced to the Enchantress at the beginning of the film. Once the Beast turns her away, she responds by cursing him and his staff.

But she continues to pop up throughout the film and helps transition key moments of the story. The rose that she leaves behind is a symbol of the curse -- the Beast must find true love before all the petals fall. But in the live action, Belle’s love for roses leads to more than you know from the animated version.

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