'Lost' Finale: Mysteries Linger Ahead of Showdown Between Good and Evil

Lost Finale: Mysteries Linger Ahead of Showdown Between Good and Evil

It's been a long haul for faithful "Lost" viewers, but the end has come.

For six years, we've cheered on a complicated batch of plane crash survivors as they battled polar bears, ageless island inhabitants, time travel, the smoke monster and one another.

We've watched Sawyer morph from a sarcastic egomaniac to a sarcastic unlikely hero with a hardened heart of gold. We've cheered on Hurley as he found his confidence. We cried when Jin and Sun were finally reunited only to drown in a crippled submarine.

And we've been endlessly teased with a twisting labyrinth of questions as the show wound itself around in circles of mythology, faith and science fiction.

CLICK HERE to participate in a live "Lost" fan chat, Sunday, May 23 between 6:30pm ET and 3am ET (3:30pm PT - 12am PT.)

To be fair, viewers have been given the healthiest dose of answers since the show began -- the origins of the Adam and Eve skeletons found in season one, the birth of the smoke monster and how Richard Alpert has remained so gorgeously ageless for centuries.

But there are still a smorgasbord of mysteries left. Will the "Lost" series finale (Sunday, May 23 at 9pm ET on ABC) be able to answer them all?

CLICK HERE to visit the official "Lost" site.

'Lost' Numbers: 4 8 15 16 23 42

It's become common theory in the blogosphere that the meaning of the series of numbers, central to so many of the island's events, may never be revealed.

The numbers -- used by Hurley to win the lottery and Desmond to keep the hatch from exploding -- have popped up dozens, perhaps hundreds, of times over the course of the show.

Way back when: the first season of "Lost."

Producers have used them almost as a "Where's Waldo" type of challenge for devoted Losties, sticking them on sports jerseys, bedside alarm clocks. They've even served as the flight number for the doomed plane itself.

But do we really need to know their significance? Probably not.

Origins of Jacob and the Man in Black

Sure, we found out how they came to live on the island -- shocker, they're twins! -- when a recent episode revealed they had been born to a shipwrecked young mother and raised by an all-knowing woman who bashed the mother's head in shortly after she gave birth.

But when the young castaway questioned the island woman about where she came from, the woman simply brushed her off, saying, "Every question I answer will simply lead to another question."

It almost seemed to be a message from "Lost" producers, straight into the living rooms of the show's fans.

But where did Mother come from? And how was she infused with the power and responsibility to keep the island safe? It's a fate that now rests with Jack. But where did it all begin?

Plots thickened in "Lost's" second season.

Smoke Monster Death: How to Guide

With a ferocious roar and streaks of lightning, the smoker monster -- now inhabiting John Locke's body -- has proved its ability to kill without much effort, flinging castaways, red shirts and other island dwellers into anything it can find.

But in the penultimate episode, Jack questions Smokey's nemesis Jacob on how exactly the pillar of smoke can be killed.

Yeah, we'd like to know that too.

Desmond and the White Light

We've all known Desmond Hume was special from the very moment he came face to face with the survivors back in season one. And not just for his mega-watt grin and swoon-worthy accent.

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