Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • The stars of AMC's "Mad Men" joined creator Matthew Weiner and ABC News' Diane Sawyer for a broadcast-exclusive interview. Weiner also took ABC News on a tour of the set and talked about how it helped create the show's story. Welcome to "Sterling, Cooper & Partners," come join us.
    Chris Komives/ABC
  • This is the reception room for "Sterling, Cooper & Partners," the current name of the advertising agency where Don Draper works. The view out the window is the actual view you would have seen from the Time Life Building. Everything is carefully chosen to reflect the era down to the phone which, according to show creator Matthew Weiner, was "the height of technology" for the time.
    Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • The logo is for "Sterling, Cooper & Partners" and it has evolved as the period has changed. "I mean, a lot of the aesthetic of the late '60s has to do with what they call, I mean, we still use the word organic and natural and so something like this that goes back to early printing makes a difference," Weiner said.
    Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • This candy machine rarely appears in the show but it's a favorite prop of Weiner's. All of the candies were created by the prop department to mimic how they looked at the time.
    Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • Each of these file cabinets is filled with actual old client files and memos. Weiner explained that although the actors may never open the drawers, having those layers of authenticity helps them and the story. "They fill this with real people's real things," Weiner said. "Birthday cards, matchbooks, pencils with teethmarks on them, and it gives it a humanity that I think is what the show's about."
    Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • The conference room where the ad agency holds their meetings and all of their famous client pitches take place, including Don's pitch to Hershey's in the last episode of last season. This is a key piece of their new offices.
    Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • Weiner said they added the kitchen to reflect when American offices started adding kitchens and watercoolers, and how these became places where people could congregate. "Private conversations can happen in here," Weiner said. "Megan and Dawn can talk to each other. The secretaries can talk to each other. And it's a little bit more democratic because everybody is down here on the creative floor."
    Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • Peggy Olson's office. Weiner said of the red thermos in the front, "She has this red thermos and whenever she has a box of her things this is always at the top of it. I assume when the show is over, Lizzy will take this with her."
    Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • Here is another view of Peggy's office. Weiner pointed out, "I love this purple chair, Peggy has been battling between her obvious femininity and her business status and this was a way for us to say she's still going to have a woman's office and this was her first chair when she first got there."
    Bonnie McLean/ABC
  • The staircase was a symbol of "Sterling, Cooper's" success after a few difficult years. On set, the staircase leads to nowhere. "We actually have two staircases? That goes into nowhere and this goes up into nowhere," Weiner said. "There was a lie when they opened the agency that they had two floors but they were struggling to get by and eventually said we're going to buy two floors and put in a staircase."
    Chris Komives/ABC
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