© Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    In the late 1970s, Janette Beckman and David Corio were freelance photographers for rival music weeklies in London: Melody Maker and New Musical Express, respectively. These were the largest circulation music papers, both hugely influential in a particularly fertile time in underground scene -- up-and-coming bands were desperate to grace their pages. "Catch the Beat: The Roots of Punk and Hip Hop Photographs" is a new exhibit at New York's Morrison Hotel Gallery that collects some of their more iconic images. Beckman shot this photo for the cover of the Police's first album, "Outlandos d'Amour," in a tunnel on London's South Bank in 1978.
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Salt 'N' Pepa perform at Radio City Music Hall in New York, May 27, 1994. Photographer David Corio began his professional career in 1978, at just 18, taking photographs of a diverse mix of musicians that would eventually include Bob Marley, U2, Tom Waits and Public Enemy, among others.
    © David Corio /Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Culture Club's Boy George at Notting Hill Gate, London, 1981. Londoner Janette Beckman began her career at the dawn of punk rock working for The Face and Melody Maker. She shot bands from The Clash to Boy George as well as three Police album covers. Moving to New York in 1982, Beckman was immediately drawn to the underground hip hop scene where she photographed pioneers Afrika Bambaataa, Run DMC, Salt-N-Pepa and Grandmaster Flash, among others.
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    This photo was taken at Virgin Records' offices in 1979 when John Lydon was doing publicity -- reluctantly -- for Public Image Ltd's groundbreaking "Metal Box" album. Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten, was best known as the lead singer of punk band the Sex Pistols from 1975 to 1978.
    © David Corio /Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Blondie lead singer Debbie Harry in her hotel room at the Ritz, London, 1981. "She was so naturally beautiful. In those days there were no hair and makeup or stylists for these shoots," says Beckman.
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Afrika Bambaataa performs at The Venue, Victoria, London, Nov. 23, 1982. This was one of the first hip-hop shows in London, and Bamabaata brought with himgraffiti legends Fab Five Freddy and Futura 2000. While he played, they spray-painted the backdrop.
    © David Corio /Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    George Clinton at the Portman Hotel, London, July 3 1985. "Hip Hop is the best thing that ever happened to music since Motown," George Clinton was quoted as saying. "That [inspired] better race relations than any other music."
    © David Corio /Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Annie Lennox at the Hope & Anchor, London, 1979. Lennox lived round the corner from Corio in Crouch End, and played local shows with The Tourists before she found fame with Eurythmics.
    © David Corio /Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Ice-T at at subway station on 57th Street in New York, Feb. 15, 1993. Although Ice-T is regarded as a west coast rapper he was born and raised in Newark, N.J. He moved to Los Angeles in seventh grade, after the death of his parents.
    © David Corio /Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Shane MacGowan in Soho, London, in 1981 on a typical gray British day. Shane was infamous -- he'd been "drunk and bloodied in virtually every pub in London worth mentioning," recalls Beckman. The future Pogues frontman was in a group called The Nipple Eerectors at the time.
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Ian Dury at Brighton Top Rank in 1979. "He was an extraordinary performer and there was always a sense of joyful mayhem on the stage with his band The Blockheads, providing tight funky rhythms," says Corio.
    © David Corio /Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Dee Dee Ramone, at Hammersmith Odeon, 1978. "The Ramones came to London in 1979; they were playing at the Hammersmith Odeon. They seemed almost larger than life and twice as fast as any punk band I had ever seen," says Beckman. "It was such an onslaught, like you'd been run over by a Mack truck."
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    The Clash's Joe Strummer in Milan, Italy, 1981. "I was taking individual pictures, I went up to Joe, and said, 'I have to take a picture of you'," says Beckman. "He made a muscle and I took the picture. I knew it was going to be a good one. Then the band went onstage."
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Paul Weller of The Jam, left, finally met his hero, The Who's Pete Townshend, outside the famous Marquee Club where both bands had played.
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Grandmaster Flash at The Venue, London, May 12, 1982. This was the first hip hop show to come to British shores and the sold out crowd didn't really know what to expect. On the stage there were no instruments -- just microphones for the Furious Five MC's, and a raised stage with two decks where Grandmaster Flash performed his turntable wizardry.
    © David Corio /Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Rude Boys Chuka and Dubem were identical twins who became famous in London for their style. They always dressed identically and would entertain travelers outside the Highbury and Islington tube stations playing ska and reggae music.
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy Morrison Hotel Gallery
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Run DMC in 1984. "I took my camera on the subway to Hollis, Queens. I was surprised to find a quiet tree-lined neighborhood," remembers Beckman. "The band were waiting for me on the street here they lived dressed in the by now iconic Adidas and hats."
    © Janette Beckman/Courtesy
  • Punk and Hip Hop Photographs by Janette Beckman & David Corio

    Wu Tang Clan's RZA in Tribeca, New York, May 4, 1994. He was shooting a video for his offshoot rap group The Gravediggaz. The vampire teeth were temporary metal caps for the video.
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