Robin Williams, in the Moment

Robin Williams: Seriously Funny
Share
Copy

Talking with Academy Award-winning actor Robin Williams can feel like a mental workout.

During an interview with ABC News' Bill Weir, the comedic actor's brain seemed to work in spurts as he changed subjects and slipped into various voices or characters. It's this special talent that has earned him an Oscar, several Grammys and soldout shows on his stand-up comedy tours.

In his current -- and first -- foray on Broadway, he plays the central character in "Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo," for the next 5½ months.

"My character is a Bengal tiger, who starts out in the zoo and eventually gets killed and becomes a ghost," Williams told "Nightline." "Basically, it's like 'Waiting for Godot' in Iraq."

Now residing near San Francisco, Williams, 59, began his career in the 1970s doing stand-up. He draws his stand-up material, he said, from various moments happening around him, from conversations with people to current events, including the upcoming Oscars.

"When you go out on stand-up, you do like at least a month of just starting off with a base and then as you go out, things will appear in the news, things will happen," he said. "It's weird with 'The King's Speech,' after watching the K-k-k-k-king's Speech and thinking if Hitler had an impediment, we wouldn't have had a problem."

Or, Williams said, he'll come up with material from his own life, such as the open-heart surgery he underwent in 2009.

"After surgery you come up with a whole other thing about what life is and the idea of what surgery was," he said. "The idea of heart failure, the idea of, with all these genetic replacements and genetic enhancements ... eventually it will be like, 'Gil, did you take drugs? You just went 100 meters in 3 seconds.' 'I know it's weird isn't it?'"

After falling in love with drama in high school, Williams attended the Julliard School in New York City in 1973 but left in 1976 to move to Los Angeles. It was there that he landed his big break as the alien Mork in the popular TV sitcom "Mork and Mindy," which ran from 1978 to 1982.

Robin Williams Says His Son's Birth Helped Him Kick Cocaine

Almost 30 years after starring in the show and playing numerous other characters since then, Williams said "Mork" is what strangers on the street still shout out to him.

"Oh yeah, 'Diddy, Diddy,' variations of 'nanoo, nanoo,' 'Pork and Sandy,'" he said. "It was TV, and it hit so big, it's still in people's memory banks. ... At first I was like, I've got an Academy Award, but it's just what people remember."

But with that massive amount of fame early in his career came massive indulgence, and Williams developed an addiction to cocaine in the late 1970s. He said the birth of his first son, Zak, in 1983, was what prompted him to kick the drug habit.

"The one thing that cleaned me up from that was having a kid," he said. "That's immediate. I didn't have any rehabs or groups. I just kind of took my mother's advice of vitamins and exercise. You realize, OK, now you have this responsibility, and [I] dealt with it."

Williams remained sober for decades, through the heights of his movie career. He won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his role as a psychologist in "Good Will Hunting" in 1998, and had been nominated for his roles in "Good Morning, Vietnam" (1987), "Dead Poets Society" (1989) and "The Fisher King" (1991).

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: In this stock image, a woman with a hangover is pictured.
Peter Dazeley/Getty Images
null
Danny Martindale/Getty Images
PHOTO: Woman who received lab-grown vagina says she now has normal life.
Metropolitan Autonomous University and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine
PHOTO:
Redfin | Inset: David Livingston/Getty Images