'Sex and the City 2': Fantasy or Farce?

Asked if she feels burdened by the sex-symbol role she has been cast in and growing older, she told TheWrap.com last month, "You know, I can't control what people project on me. And I think the great thing about getting older is that you don't give a s*** as much."

"The thing I'm most proud of is that I'm in my 50s and I'm still a leading lady," she told the New York Times recently.

Leslie Colette, a marketing consultant in the Bay Area, said she loves to see actresses over 40 still practicing their craft on the big screen.

"I don't care what she's doing, how airbrushed she is, it's still cool," Colette, 46, told ABCNews.com.

She said that "Sex and the City" touched on issues relevant to her life.

"Even though it's postioned as fantasy and escape, they still talk about aging and kids and divorce -- all the things that women go through in middle age," Colette said.

One thing the film will touch on is how women's feelings about their careers change over time. A clip from the film shows Miranda, a working mom and the most career-focused of the group, no longer in love with her job as a lawyer.

Cynthia Nixon, the actress who plays Miranda, is also a working mom of two, but her real-life partner is a woman, Christine Marinoni.

Since going public, Nixon, 44, has been outspoken about their relationship, recently calling Marinoni "a short man with boobs."

"A lot of what I love about her is her butchness. I'm not saying I fell in love with her in a sexually neutral way. I love her sexuality -- it's a big part of what I love about her -- but I feel like it was her," Nixon told the Advocate recently.

"It wasn't something in me that was waiting to come out. It was like, this person is undeniable. How can I let this person walk by?"

Meanwhile, Kristin Davis, who plays Charlotte, a stay-at-home mom who couldn't wait to be married, remains unmarried, though she was recently linked to photographer Russell James.

"My life is very, very different from Charlotte's. I'm much more independent," she once said. "I feel like it's important to say that not everyone has to get married. Everyone thinks it's very important that we have to be paired off all in twos. It's like this crazy antiquated 1950s thing and that's not the way life is."

While most women's lives are nothing like "Sex and the City," the movies still manage to capture the ultimate connections among women. That has as much to do with the chemistry of the four actresses as the writing of the film.

It's why Jana Platina Phipps, a mother of two who owns a home furnishings business outside New York City, will go see the film with a group of girlfriends.

"It's the bond of friendship," Phipps told ABCNews.com. "Stripped down of all the worldly stuff, the movie is still about the relationships. That's what made the first one successful."

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