Trevor Noah mocks Mark Zuckerberg over 'robot' Senate testimony

PHOTO: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, April 10, 2018. PlayJim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
WATCH Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg answers questions, addresses possibility of regulation

Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg endured more than four hours of grilling Tuesday on Capitol Hill, but Trevor Noah said he doesn't expect much to come out of it.

"I'm not going to lie, I don't know if it's just because I've never seen him with other humans before, but it genuinely looked like Zuckerberg sent a robot version of himself," Noah, host of "The Daily Show," said Tuesday night. "Like, look at him -- it looks like he's in 'Westworld' right now."

Noah, who compared Zuckerberg's Senate hearing to a visit to "the principal’s office," said Americans have a right to know more about where their Facebook data goes, but they shouldn’t count on Congress to make that happen.

"I think we can all agree that because Facebook has so much power and influence, they need to be held accountable," Noah said. "But I think we can also agree that the people Facebook is accountable to maybe shouldn't be these guys.

"I feel like Zuckerberg has already experienced the worst punishment of all. He had to spend four hours explaining Facebook to senior citizens."

During the hearing with senators on the Commerce and Judiciary committees, Zuckerberg defended himself and the social-networking platform, and he apologized for mistakes that possibly led to the Cambridge Analytica scandal that affected as many as 87 million users.

PHOTO: The advocacy group, Avaaz, placed 100 life-sized cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol, April 10, 2018, in Washington.Zach Gibson/Getty Images
The advocacy group, Avaaz, placed 100 life-sized cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol, April 10, 2018, in Washington.

"It's clear now that we didn't do enough to prevent these tools from being used for harm as well," Zuckerberg said. "That goes for fake news, foreign interference in elections and hate speech, as well as developers and data privacy.

"We didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I’m sorry. I started Facebook, I run it, and I’m responsible for what happens here."

On Wednesday, Zuckerberg is scheduled for another Congressional hearing before the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

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