READ EXCERPT: 'If I Stay,' by Gayle Forman

"Ah, fame, wasted on the youth," Dad says, but he's smiling. I know he's excited for Adam. Proud even. I leaf through the newspaper to the calendar section. There's a small blurb about Shooting Star, with an even smaller picture of the four of them, next to a big article about Bikini and a huge picture of the band's lead singer: punk-rock diva Brooke Vega. The bit about them basically says that local band Shooting Star is opening for Bikini on the Portland leg of Bikini's national tour. It doesn't mention the evenbigger-to-me news that last night Shooting Star headlined at a club in Seattle and, according to the text Adam sent me at midnight, sold out the place.

"Are you going tonight?" Dad asks.

"I was planning to. It depends if they shut down the whole state on account of the snow." "It is approaching a blizzard," Dad says, pointing to a single snowflake floating its way to the earth. "I'm also supposed to rehearse with some pianist from the college that Professor Christie dug up." Professor Christie, a retired music teacher at the university who I've been working with for the last few years, is always looking for victims for me to play with. "Keep you sharp so you can show all those Juilliard snobs how it's really done," she says.

I haven't gotten into Juilliard yet, but my audition went really well. The Bach suite and the Shostakovich had both flown out of me like never before, like my fingers were just an extension of the strings and bow. When I'd finished playing, panting, my legs shaking from pressing together so hard, one judge had clapped a little, which I guess doesn't happen very often. As I'd shuffled out, that same judge had told me that it had been a long time since the school had "seen an Oregon country girl." Professor Christie had taken that to mean a guaranteed acceptance. I wasn't so sure that was true. And I wasn't 100 percent sure that I wanted it to be true. Just like with Shooting Star's meteoric rise, my admission to Juilliard—if it happens— will create certain complications, or, more accurately, would compound the complications that have already cropped up in the last few months.

"I need more coffee. Anyone else?" Mom asks, hovering over me with the ancient percolator. I sniff the coffee, the rich, black, oily French roast we all prefer. The smell alone perks me up. "I'm pondering going back to bed," I say. "My cello's at school, so I can't even practice."

"Not practice? For twenty-four hours? Be still, my broken heart," Mom says. Though she has acquired a taste for classical music over the years—"it's like learning to appreciate a stinky cheese"—she's been a not-always-delighted captive audience for many of my marathon rehearsals. I hear a crash and a boom coming from upstairs. Teddy is pounding on his drum kit. It used to belong to Dad. Back when he'd played drums in a big-in-our-town, unknown- anywhere-else band, back when he'd worked at a record store.

Dad grins at Teddy's noise, and seeing that, I feel a familiar pang. I know it's silly but I have always wondered if Dad is disappointed that I didn't become a rock chick. I'd meant to. Then, in third grade, I'd wandered over to the cello in music class—it looked almost human to me. It looked like if you played it, it would tell you secrets, so I started playing. It's been almost ten years now and I haven't stopped.

"So much for going back to sleep," Mom yells over Teddy's noise.

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