'App-orexia': Can Smartphone Applications Be Bad for Your Health?

"She always said, 'Hannah, that's not feasible. Those people don't even look like that.' And I guess learning about the calorie counting and everything, I realized that wasn't gonna help me. It wasn't gonna help me live."

Kula is now fighting back, seeking help for her eating disorder at the Renfrew Center. She's following a meal plan and has stopped using her smartphone application. She hopes all of these changes will help shape her from the inside out.

"I had lost myself in what I thought I should be," she said. And now I'm kind of just refinding myself and who I am."

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For now, Kula continues to take life minute by minute and meal by meal.

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