Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor Backs Elena Kagan Nomination

PHOTO Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O?Connor spoke to George Stephanopoulos about the Supreme Court, Arizona immigration and her latest project, iCivics.

The first woman ever to sit on the nation's highest court has gotten behind Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan, but warned her of the "dreadful, unpleasant" nomination process.

Retired justice Sandra Day O'Connor, now focused on a new web-based initiative to teach civics to students, said she believes Kagan, the U.S. solicitor general, will likely be confirmed.

VIDEO: Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day OConnor weighs in on Elena Kagan.
Ex-Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on Elena Kagan

"She seems to be very well qualified academically," O'Connor, 80, told "Good Morning America's" George Stephanopoulos today.

But she stopped short of offering any words of wisdom to President Obama's nominee.

"She doesn't need advice," O'Connor said. "But just, she'll have to go through the process of the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings. And I don't care who you are, it's a difficult, unpleasant experience for the nominee. It's just something you have to go through."

Now four years removed from her time on the bench, O'Connor has been working fervently on her newest passion: iCivics, a free, web-based education project designed to teach middle school students. It also offers teachers comprehensive teaching materials.

Click HERE to visit iCivics.org

According to a 2007 Annenberg Public Policy Center study, two out of three Americans can name a judge on "American Idol," the hit reality TV singing competition, but only 1 in 7 can name the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. O'Connor said that was "scary."

O'Connor said she hoped the iCivics would engage students across the country.

Half of U.S. states have stopped making civics and government a requirement for high school, she said, adding that she believed this was an "unintended consequence" of the No Child Left Behind Act, the controversial federal educational policy that rewards schools for meeting certain goals.

The program was "an incentive to the schools to get their kids up to snuff on math and science and reading, but they were not getting money for American history, or civics or anything else," she said.

O'Connor: Supreme Court a 'Marvelous Place'

iCivics offers several games for students, among them "LawCraft," where students can play a member of Congress, "Supreme Decision," in which students get to cast the deciding vote on a case before the Supreme Court and "Executive Command," in which players get to be president of the United States.

O'Connor said the games are fun and effective.

"That's what they often use their … computer for, to play games," she said. "So we've tracked that and made these games fun. And the kids come back with … 'Oh, this is cool.' 'This is neat.' 'It's fun,'" she said.

O'Connor called the Supreme Court a "marvelous place."

One of her happiest days on the Supreme Court, she said, was when Ginsburg joined the bench.

"It made such a difference, because until that time, the media … focused on what the one woman justice did," she said.

"The minute we got a second woman, that stopped."

If Kagan is confirmed, she would join justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, making three women on bench of the nation's highest court.

It's a remarkable feat, given that O'Connor couldn't even get a job interview when she graduated at the top of her class from Stanford University in 1952. No one was hiring female lawyers back then.

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