First Case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Reported in US

MERS causes a severe acute respiratory illness that has killed nearly 100 people, mostly in Saudi Arabia.
2:05 | 05/03/14

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Transcript for First Case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Reported in US
acted on her intuition. Now, a deadly virus thought to have originated in camels in the middle east, has turned up in Indiana. It's called Mrs. And it causes respiratory illness. What is the latest case in the U.S. Mean for people living in this country? Let's bring in Dr. Jennifer Ashton for more on this. Tell us about mers. What is it? Think of it like sars, which is a respiratory virus. Only, believe it or not, it appears to be more deadly. This is a brand-new virus. It's only about two years old. We're learning a lot about it. It did start in the middle east. Migrated to some countries in Europe. And now, made landfall in the United States. This is something we expected. But the CDC and the world health organization, the disease trackers, the medical detectives, with working around the clock to learn more and more about this case. How contagious is it? We know this man is in isolation at the hospital. He's in isolation because he's hospitalized. The CDC says it poses a low risk to the general U.S. Population. People who are on the plane that landed in Chicago, on the bus that went from Chicago to Indiana. They will be contacting those people just out of a sense of precaution. It's really close, prolonged contact. And we don't know that much about how it spreads, person-to-person. Only that it appears that it can spread person-to-person. We don't know how contagious it is. What are some of the treatments out there? Are there? There really isn't. There's no vaccine. There's no direct antiviral medication. The treatment is supportive. People have been to this part of the world where there are cases. They get shortness of breath, fever, severe cough, they have to alert them to a medical professional and tell them where they've been. People in this country, just precautionary. Better to be proactive. Not a cause for panic at this point. And we wish this man well in his recovery. And we'll be following it closely. Thanks, guys. Now, to the life-or-death

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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