Pietz Murder Trial: Voicemails Raise Questions in Court

Nicole Pietz's family left frantic voicemails that were played in the trial of her accused husband.
2:00 | 10/03/13

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Transcript for Pietz Murder Trial: Voicemails Raise Questions in Court
Now, to the case of the suburban seattle man on trial for murdering his wife. More than seven years after her death. Emotional voicemail messages from her entire family revealed in court. Abc's neal karlinsky has the latest for us. This is tamara. I just got an e-mail from dave. About you're not being home. Call me. Reporter: It was january of 2006. Nicole pietz was suddenly missing. And her friends and family were frantically calling her cell phone. It's your sister. Where are you? Give me a call. I love you, bye. Reporter: Her phone was never found. But the voicemails, kept on file by at&t, were played at her husband's murder trial wednesday. A gut wrenching replay of the panic nicole's loved ones were going through in the first few days. Sitting in court, the family was in tears listening. Hi, nicole. It's mom. We're very worried. Please, call me immediately. Day or night. I really just need to talk to you. And I love you. Reporter:40 voicemails over 4 days. There was no sign of a crime yet. Only confusion about where pietz was. But prosecutors pointed out only three messages were from her husband, david. All on the first day of her disappearance. All sounding rather matter of fact. Babe, give me a call. I need to know if I need to stop and get food for ellen and jason. So, give me a call. I love you, bye. Reporter: Nicole pietz's body was found weeks later in the wood. Strangled, prosecutors say, by her husband's own hands. A family friend testified about something david pietz asked her at his wife's funeral. He wanted to know what to do to get life insurance and how to go about doing that. Reporter: Weeks into this trial, david pietz's character has come under steady attack. He maintains his innocence. And day after day, his expression gives up nothing. For "good morning america," neal karlinsky, abc news, seattle.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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