Doctors Could More Easily Recognize When Teens Have Concussions

ABC News' Dr. Jennifer Ashton has details on which symptoms are associated with teenage athletes.
2:07 | 07/13/14

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Transcript for Doctors Could More Easily Recognize When Teens Have Concussions
Brandi Hitt, ABC news, los Angeles. A medical alert. Now recognize symptoms in teenagers of ton cushion. They were thought to have more likely emotional problem. Let's bring in Jennifer Ashton. You attended concussion conferences. What are your thoughts? This sheds light on what symptoms are associated with other symptoms in the teenage athlete. This is important information. Anything that can increase our understanding of the course or clinical course of a concussion is very important information. And what are some of the biggest myths out there regarding teens and concussions? I think you have a headache or you don't. That's the only simple Tom. That's not true. There are four categories of symptoms that parents, players coaches need to be aware of. The first is physical. Most of the time migraine-like symptoms. Headache, sensitivity no noise. Emotional. Cognitive, focus and concentration. And sleep disturbance. Not all athletes will have every one. We're in the middle of the summer. Gearing up for the start of the school year. What should parents look for? The key is to be proactive and reactive. In terms of proactive. Look to get the youth athlete a baseline computer test. Sit a neurocognitive test. In terms of being reactive, be patient. These things take time. One study found that at two weeks, only 60% of athletes were recovered. When in doubt, sit out. And see a doctor quickly as well. Absolutely. We've been focusing on American football. This is a good segue to Dan because soccer is now a rising issue. Any sport. Including cheerleading. Jen, thank you. We're going to switch gears

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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