Could ESPN's 'OJ: Made in America' Win an Oscar?

ABC News' Michael Strahan sat down with the director of the Oscar-nominated documentary, Ezra Edelman.
2:52 | 02/09/17

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Transcript for Could ESPN's 'OJ: Made in America' Win an Oscar?
house, watch a little TV and we are counting down to the oscars. Taking you behind ESPN's "O.J.: Made in America" nominated for best documentary feature and I had a chance to sit down with its director and producer, Ezra Edelman. Take a look. I told them, O.J., you're breaking the laws of god. One day everybody is going to know everything that you've done, man. When you were growing up what was your idea of O.J. Simpson? O.J.? Oh, man, O.J. Was the guy who when I was in an airport however few types when I was a kid, I'd be dodging people running like going -- Jumping over luggage. Take it from O.J. Simpson, there's only one superstar. Like weaving through ongoing people in the terminal as if I were O.J. He was that guy. There weren't that many plaque faces on television and he stuck out. O.J., seemed like he wanted to remove himself or remove race from how you saw him. There was this famous quote about O.J. Said I am not black, I am O.J. You think he was trying to say I'm not black, I'm not white or do you think he was trying to say I'm O.J. And then there's everybody else? Probably more to the point, I am O.J. I'm exceptional and I think when you watch this film there's a sense that you get of the -- that exceptionalism that he felt and, by the way, that was bred in him based on the way the world treated him. When you are that good of an athlete. When you are that good looking, that charming from an early age, things came easy to him and I think you maybe get used to it. The Buffalo bills, great rookie, O.J. Simpson. The way he was treated was a lot different than the way most African-Americans were being treated especially in L.A. At that time. And why was it important for you to intersect that. Because we know what that conversation was in '94/'95 what happened with the murder and the trial. What it became. O.J. Becoming this symbol in many ways for African-Americans in the criminal justice system then you hear, well, how did O.J. Of all people become this symbol for African-Americans in the criminal justice system and think about the treatment that O.J. Enjoyed at the hands of the cops. Well, he was friends with the cops. All of a sudden he sort of -- the argument being waged was that he was being framed by the police. That he was being treated like every other African-American that's gone through the system. Orenthal James Simpson not guilty of the crime of murder. For everyone to have celebrated the way they did at his acquittal, if you don't go and look back and say this is what's happening, you don't get this profound irony this story brought and that's the story. You got a tragedy in your life. ??? And you can see "O.J.: Made in America" this Sunday at 8:00 P.M. Eastern on ESPN2. Coming up, the crafts that

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