Fashion students transform wedding gowns into completely new outfits

The students competed in a fashion challenge, and style expert Joe Zee and Marie Claire editor-in-chief Anne Fulenwider judged their final designs.
6:20 | 11/24/17

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Transcript for Fashion students transform wedding gowns into completely new outfits
we're talking wedding gowns and weddings. Our frugal fashionista series and every year thousands say yes to a dress that's usually white and that they are planning to wear only once. Yeah, so we did this to increase the life span of that dress you probably have in storage. We challenged three design schools to take this exact wedding gown and completely transform it into something you could wear again. Lara Spencer and I were outside our studio for the big reveal when the weather was a little bit warmer. Take a look. Leeanne Marshall is winning waif reviews for her 2018 spring/zhuer collection. The "Project runway" winner is coming up with red carpet gown, many from leftover fabric. We can always reuse ferals always. Reporter: We invited Leanne to men Dell Goldberg fabrics for a challenge from marist college, Thomas Jefferson university in Philadelphia, and montclair state university, the goal to recycle as much of the dress as possible. Let's do the honors. Three, two, one. Three identical wedding dress, one for each team to remake into a new garment. The judging based on the amount of dress they use, creativity and technical skill. The budget, just $50. My first thought was how to make it as wild as possible. Wild? Kind of like an avant-garde style. I'm inspired by my girl being comfortable. She is going to feel empowered and feel regal. I value like craftsmanship and a lot of handwork. Me and Tommy could be a great team because we share a lot of those qualities. One is make these rosettes. Three pieces and they could be mixed and matched with other things. Only half a coat right now but you're seeing is essentially that. The final look will be magic. I'm proud we're making this look luxurious. I definitely like fell in love with what we made. Reporter: With just finishing touches left time to weigh each team's leftover fabric. Thomas Jefferson university, 7 1/4 ounces, monthclair, 7 3/4 and marist just under 2 ounces. Take a look at how efficient marist college was in using as much of this dress as possible. This is all that's left over from the original putting them in the lead of that category of competition. Lara, take it away. This was quite the challenge, Leanne, you are a wedding dress designer yourself. What's the roo he Jackson so far? I'm completely blown away by what our student designers were able to come up with. Three completely different looks, cannot even tell they were once wedding dresses. I might have taken a peek and wow is what I can say. Meet our judges, fashion expert, Mr. Joe zee in the house. Ah. And "Marie Claire" editor in chief, Anne fuller. You'll be judging the students on creativity, technical skill and the amount of original dress used as you just heard. Marist college looking good. Are you guys ready to see the final looks? Yes. Come on out, models. Wow! Wow. There is our first look. Montclair state university. Unbelievable. Our second look now marist college, looking good. I love that color. Look at that. And finally Thomas Jefferson university, also with a three-piece. That was not a wedding dress in its former life. Wow! Ail I can say. Our judges are about to reveal the winner of our frugal fashionista wedding dress revamp competition. We want to hear from the designers themselves first we start with John and Gisele from montclair university. How did you come up with this look. We took our strengths which was more so on like the creative wild side. We wanted to go within avant-garde look and just tackled it head on. Great neckline too. Great job. Congratulations. We move on to the ladies from marist who used nearly every bit of the wedding dress. Welcome to Gabriel and Katie. Let me ask you, your biggest challenge in creating this three-piece look. We focused on using organic dyes which is hard to do with 100% polyester fabric so used turmeric root to get that and rubbing roses to get that beautiful purple color. Great job. Finally to Thomas Jefferson university. Karen and Tommy and Tommy, talk to me about your idea for turning a wedding dress into like a beach fun party look. We wanted to make the wedding dress look not like wedding dress lace and turned it stuffed it places sewed it and made it into fun motives. Your thoughts first on montclair university. First of all I think your dress is probably the most closest resembling the original wedding dress. I have to be honest I think it's almost a little bit too costumy, maybe a little too "Game of thrones" but look at the success of "Game of thrones." Maybe it's a good thing. I'm going to ask you about the marist team. Show everybody how that jacket comes off and then you've got the shirt, you've got the little cute shorts. I think that's a really fun vest and you made a handbag. I was so surprised you use the most wedding dress because you really hid it. There must be so much depth and impressed with your technical skill. You heard it there and finally Thomas Jefferson university, this chic, lean look. Oh, my gosh. Well, first of all, there's nothing that resembles a wedding dress. I love how much you sort of repurposed that in a way that's completely done. That coat, that embroidery, I mean, Anne and I got to thousands of fashion shows like that could be on a runway. It is my pleasure to announce the winner of our frugal fashionista wedding dress revamp and that winner is Thomas Jefferson university!

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