FBI Warns Public About Virtual Kidnapping Hoaxes

Scammers could falsely claim to be holding loved ones captive and demand immediate ransom.
2:32 | 08/19/14

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Transcript for FBI Warns Public About Virtual Kidnapping Hoaxes
new warning from the FBI about a terrifying hoax cropping up around the country called virtual kidnapping. Many skahhers falsely claim to be holding a loved one captive and demand immediate ransom. These callers now have a new target and ABC's linsey Davis has the story. Get in your vehicle. No, I'm scared. I don't know you. You're threatening me. No. Okay, Jason, go downstairs -- You're listening to a terrifying scam and this morning the FBI is warning about a new twist in these so-called virtual kidnapping hochs. Yeah, I'm not going to waste pie time on the phone. Reporter: There are variations of the scam but here's generally how it works. The caller claims to have kidthatted a loved one then they threaten to do brutal things this was a ransom is paid immediately. In many cases they claim to be members of a drug cartel and order their targets to wire transfer the money to Mexico. The hopes instead of investing time and try to figure out whether or not it's a legitimate kidnapping that they might be willing just to pay to resolve the problem. Reporter: Maddie Montoya recorded part of this call. I'm scared. What do you want me to do? Reporter: Claiming the caller threatened to kill her brother if she didn't pay but she didn't fall for it. He would kind of tell me things that didn't make sense. Reporter: But this Connecticut couple did posting this video on youtube to warn others. We're doing this just to kind of spread the word. Reporter: Now the FBI is warning so-called kidnap hoax scammers have a new target in their sights, doctors. Including three people in just one day this week in New Mexico. He says, guy yag goes, I says, yeah, I have somebody that wants to talk to you and this girl starts screaming help and then I could hear like them pulling her away. Reporter: Last month Dr. Noel Lopez received this frightening call but could sense something wasn't quite right. It's me, dad. Who's me? It was scary to get a call like this. Reporter: It's critical to ask questions, engage in dialogue. Force the virtual kidnapper to provide you more details which he or she does not have. Reporter: That could be the key to keeping your money and yourself from being scammed. For "Good morning America," linsey Davis, ABC news, new York. You know, the FBI worries a lot of the victims are too embarrassed after their scam to come forward. Don't worry about that. You got to come forward. Ask questions. Engage in that dialogue. All right. Coming up next, what do

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