'Good Morning America' Uses Virtual Reality, Drone Technology to Go on African Safari

ABC News' Amy Robach takes viewers on a beautiful tour of a Tanzanian crater known as Africa's "Garden of Eden."
3:20 | 02/21/16

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Transcript for 'Good Morning America' Uses Virtual Reality, Drone Technology to Go on African Safari
And we're so excited to tell you about "Gma" on safari live. It's an opening event with our own Amy robach. It will feature the latest in virtual reality and drone technology. To transport all of our viewers. It's known as the garden of Eden of Africa. Tuesday, for the first time in network history. You the viewer using your tablet or mobile advice. You're going to be able to choose your own adventure. Im-360 is our partner in this. Amy robach joining us from Tanzania with more. Looking a little bit more like a better looking crocodile Dundee. Amy, good morning. You have to look the part. You wear it well. Walk us through the moving parts that will make this "gma""ed a Venn sure so cool. This is the first ever live safari in the ngorongoro crater. It's never been done before. We have a crew of 22. The drones. The im-360 camera. You at home don't have the travel the 28 hours it took me to get here. You can, from the comfort of your couch, go along with us. We'll be moving live in vehicles throw the ngorongoro crater. There are about 25,000 animals in the crater. Great migration has begun. You can sit at home and move with us. And see whatever you want to see with our 360 technology. It is going to be spectacular. So, we're bringing safari to you. Back there around the country. And, it's breathtaking. Well, Amy, we want to say thank you -- I want to also tell you. Go ahead, hon. Go ahead. I was going say, as we were coming here, the trek in kilimanjaro to here, we made a stop. We got to go to a refuge of sorts that saves and rescued orphaned animals. So much poaching here we'll be talking about as well in the next couple of days. I got the meet with a very safe barrier in between me and these two lion cubs. They're 1 1/2. They were not the cute, furry kinds. They were ferocious. My heart was pounding, even though I had a steel door between me and them. It was really incredible just to see a wild man. They're only going to be there for calm of weeks. They're fattening them up. They're going take them back to the wild and they'll flourish. I met a catacal. I got to hold her. Her name is ginger. She's going to be released as well. They saved her from being shipped off to the middle east. This is an incredible center. It saves so many animals. It's hoping to -- toprevent all of the atrocities exited across the country. You're oohing and aahing. Ginger is cute, isn't she? That's Sara you hear. She's ooh'ing and aah'ing. An adorable pair. Amy, so jealous of your experience. Appreciative of the message you're bringing home. Thanks for traveling 28 hours.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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