Government Issues Alert About Drones, Passenger Planes

The U.S. secretary of transportation pleads with Americans to keep the remote-controlled aircraft away from commercial planes.
2:19 | 06/24/14

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Transcript for Government Issues Alert About Drones, Passenger Planes
passenger planes. A growing number of incidents. And the government issuing a new alert. ABC's David Kerley is in Washington for us with the latest on all this. Good morning, David. Reporter: Good morning, robin. This wasn't just the FAA issuing a warning. It was the secretary of transportation, who reiterated the current rules. Pleading with Americans to keep the aircraft under control, as the number of incidents is on the rise. They are small, light, and inexpensive. And sometimes flying too close to real aircraft. We just saw a little drone below us. Reporter: That was a jumbo jet on approach to New York's JFK last year. And just weeks ago, near Tallahassee's airport. Somebody reported three miles east of the field, a remote-controlled aircraft. Reporter: A minijet got too close to an aircraft. In the past 2 years, 15 sti incidents in which remote-controlled aircraft got too close to planes. A nasa database shows 50 incidents in the past decade. Worrisome for pilots. Hitting an airplane going 200, 250 miles per hour, if it hits the wrong place, comes in through the cockpit, hits the glass, it can hit the pilot or the co-pilot. Reporter: That's why this morning the secretary of transportation is warning anyone who buys a drone, to follow the current rules. Keep them away from airports and populated areas. The problem, the technology is moving much faster than the rulemaking. Look what we found at a hobby store for $700. This is the phantom. Four rotors, carry a camera. And go 2,200 feetings. Those capabilities outstrip the current rules. The FAA was supposed to have new rules last year, but that's been delayed this year, with tests across the country. Privacy a big concern. And Sunday, a Seattle woman looked out her window and reported a drone was staring back at her. And she called police. Technology is growing so fast. 22 miles per hour, it can travel. A new medical report with a warning for parents. That fortified cereal we give

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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