Inside look at new technology to protect bus, train stations

ABC News' David Kerley goes inside the secure research lab where Department of Homeland Security officials are developing high-tech gadgets to spot terror before it happens.
2:20 | 12/12/17

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Transcript for Inside look at new technology to protect bus, train stations
Back now with a look inside the security lab of the future. And in the wake of that subway terror attack in New York, new high-tech gadgets are being developed to protect bus and train stations. ABC's David Kerley is at union station in Washington, D.C. With more this morning. Good morning, David. Reporter: Good morning, Michael. A lot wonder why do you have to stand in line and go through a TSA checkpoint at the airport but in bus stations you can walk right in. They're in the middle of research looking tore technology to make spots like this safer. Homeland security is working on high-tech gadgets to spot terror before it happens. Some may come out of this secure research lab near Washington which we got exclusive access to. Who would have thought pictures from wi-fi? Exactly. But it works. Reporter: The idea that panels like this could be mounted in stations. You might not even notice them but those radio waves could highlight metal or liquid objects. Taking advantage of signals that are very low to give us indicators of what you have in your bag, what you may be carrying under your jacket. Things like that. Reporter: This technology may be three to five years away but changes to for transit police across the country use in philly. What we have is a link to over 28,000 cameras. Reporter: Those cameras and video could take a sci-fi leap forward. Dhs is working on a computer program monitoring all those video feeds to determine if a bag has been left unattended in a station. The computer will figure that out. Yes, we want to make sure that we give these operators the information surrounding the circumstances of that bag being there. Reporter: Those operators then can rewind the tape to see who left the bag, even highlight the person and then search other cameras to find out where that person went. That video system is being tested at the metro in Washington, D.C. And could spread throughout the country if it is working correctly. Another tool to target the terrorist, guys, who still see these train stations and bus stations as potential targets. Michael. Thank you, David and technology is pretty incredible. That could be powerful. Coming up, the "Stranger

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