Malala Yousafzai's Dream to 'Become Prime Minister of Pakistan'

The 17-year-old human rights activist talks about adapting her book for young readers.
3:18 | 08/18/14

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Transcript for Malala Yousafzai's Dream to 'Become Prime Minister of Pakistan'
Now to the young woman who's one of the most well-known human rights activists in the world. At the age of 17, Malala, who survived a Taliban shooting in Pakistan, wrote "I am Malala" for young readers. We asked young women to join us. We were together last time, it was your 17th birthday. We were in Nigeria, and you were there trying to help bring your sisters, the kidnapped schoolgirls in Nigeria, back home. Are you satisfied with the government's response to the situation? I'm happy that the president helped and supported them. But the girl's education is not confirmed. They cannot go to school. The Malala fund, we are doing a project there, we want to give them the education, get scholarships. And also opportunities to get connected with each other and try to come out of this trauma. Let's talk about your new book. This is the latest edition of "I Malala" why so important that young people read this? We already had this book. Might be difficult for the young readers to understand it. There should be a children's edition as well. The story is the same. Me, and I want to go to school. I hope that the children will learn how important education is for them and for their country and how they should focus on it. And I remember in Nigeria, you told me with a slight smile on your face, you couldn't wait to turn 18. You might be able to travel alone. Your father travels with you everywhere you go. But you have a lot of hopes for the future. My father is still here with me. One more year to go. Yes, one more year to go. I'm hoping to learn driving. I'm 17. But this is a news flash. You're taking a driving lesson soon? Yes. And I have decided that I would have a one-seat car. So you can be on your own, truly. I love that. What's next for you. You mentioned college? So I'm hoping to go to a good university, thinking about oxford and Harvard and hope to get admission. Then after that, I still have this idea of joining politics and this is my dream to become the prime minister of Pakistan and to help my country. I believe if anyone can do all of what you just said, it's you. And for the second year in a row, you have been nominated for the Nobel peace prize. You're just 17. Last year I said that I still do not deserve it. I still say that because I have started a campaign. And it's not over yet. It's not completed yet. And when I see that I have done something and I have achieved this big goal, which I always dream for, then I would think, okay, now I deserve it. But I think it's very early now. What a remarkable young woman. And "I am Malala kwots, the young readers edition is available everywhere tomorrow. Later on, we will be in the united nations with Malala, and you can watch that later this morning on Yahoo, it's at 11:00 eastern time.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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