Malaysian Plane Mystery: No Progress in Search

Col. Stephen Ganyard discusses the plane that seemingly vanished before reaching Beijing.
3:00 | 03/13/14

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Transcript for Malaysian Plane Mystery: No Progress in Search
including the malacca strait. Let's analyze this with Stephen ganyard. Bottom line six days in, no progress. No progress. We know absolutely nothing since 49 minutes after the aircraft took off. Everything else is a guess, it's supposition. Our reporter raising the question, what if it didn't crash? How serious do you take that possibility? This plane could have flown for hours and landed somewhere safely. It's possible. At this point anything is possible. We have to continue to look at anything. So we know that it was going to go to beijing. We know it had at least seven hours of fuel on board. Took a string on a map and went to beijing and drew that arc out there, that's where that airplane could be. Seven hours, it could be in Somalia, in Yemen, it could be in India. Would be able to land undetected. It's possible. Remember that part of the world is very remote. There's not radars in every place. We know the radar transponder which threw out all this data was turned off or perhaps electrical failure but no longer data coming from it. You have to take hijacking seriously. What's the single most important thing for investigators to do right now? Right now we need to get facts and I think the most encouraging thing that we heard today was the FAA and the ntsb are finally being brought in to the investigation. We finally have professionals involved in this mishap investigation and they did not dissuade the Malaysians from thinking that perhaps that airplane did take that turn west. What can they do that the Malaysians can't? They're true professionals and be able to analyze in scientific ways that the Malaysians don't have the capability of doing and have done so many investigations that they can look at, bring in new capabilities, new techniques. The air France 447, they brought in new technologies there, a search pattern, all sorts of science that can be applied here. You've been doing this a long time. Have you ever seen a mystery like this? This is baffling. Five days in and I can tell you if we were having a drink in a bar I could not give you an idea what happened. Everything is on the able at this point. Thanks very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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